Sweden

Things to do in Sweden

Most visitors to Sweden must decide how to divide their time between its cities—shopping, drinking, and eating—and exploring the country's vast wilderness, from summer days in the sun-kissed Stockholm Archipelago in the south to the land of the Lapps and reindeer in the north. Here are some stops to consider in planning your Sweden itinerary:

Cruise Stockholm's canals. One of many cities that refers to itself as the "Venice of the North," Stockholm is built on 14 islands and is crisscrossed by canals. Many operators offer canals tours, giving you a unique perspective on the capital's monuments.
Visit the Vasamuseet. The centerpiece of this museum is the Vasa, a 17th-century warship that sank near Stockholm and was recovered in the 1950s. Other exhibits cover Sweden's nautical heritage.
Get lost in Stockholm's old town. Known in Swedish as Gamla stan, the historic heart of Stockholm is an evocative maze of medieval streets.
Explore the nightlife of Malmö. Almost one in ten residents of Malmö is a student at the university, and the city's nightlife scene is always buzzing, from happy hour bars to after-hours clubs.

Check out the Swedish royal family’s Tullgarn palace, famous for its Rococo interiors and English gardens.

The iconic Swedish designer Carl Malmsten opened his shop in 1940 and promoted rustic, simple furniture of quality craftsmanship and materials.

The Vasamuseet, located on Djurgarden, is the most popular museum in Sweden. It houses the Vasa, the oldest known completed ship, built in 1628 during the reign of King Gustavus Adolphus II.

For cutting-edge Swedish labels, head to this 17th-century industrial building turned high-design mall. Browse the racks of denim at Dry Lake, or try on geometric-patterned jersey dresses at Whyred and skintight satin pants at Filippa K.

The Moderna Museet, on the island of Skeppsholmen, is home to an extensive collection of modern and contemporary paintings, sketches, photography, films, and videos from Sweden and the international arts community.

Take a tour of Grythyttan Vin, located in the rural northwest about three hours from Stockholm. The winery, started in 1999 by the Fritzell Brothers, produces both fruit and mulled wines and fruit vinegars—all from wild plants.

For off-the-map art, take a 15-minute cab ride to the workingclass neighborhood of Liljeholmen.

The market transforms an anonymous corner of the hip Södermalm neighborhood into a bustling weekend fair, filled with vendors selling everything from antique embroidered linens to exquisite wooden dolls by Swedish toymaker Fredrik Hillerborg.

An entire island is given over to this peaceful park, full of shaded walkways and encircled by paths that run along Baltic shores. Within its canopy of trees lie a zoo, theater, several museums (natural history, Nordic art), and restaurants with outdoor tables.

Echoing the scene outside, the interior is snow-white and theatrically lit.

The UNESCO World Heritage site, also known as Woodland Cemetery, is one of Stockholm's most surprising architectural landmarks. Its rolling pine forest landscape holds memorials designed by two of Sweden's most important Modernists, Sigurd Lewerentz and Gunnar Asplund.

Launched last September by publishing powerhouse Bonnier, the 20,300-square-foot gallery is the latest addition to the city's art scene.