Sweden

Sweden Travel Guide

An entire island is given over to this peaceful park, full of shaded walkways and encircled by paths that run along Baltic shores. Within its canopy of trees lie a zoo, theater, several museums (natural history, Nordic art), and restaurants with outdoor tables.

If you're lucky, you can catch a classical music concert at Stockholm's central cathedral. Take a seat on a wooden pew and enjoy the dusky evening light as it filters through the leaded glass windows and shimmers off the golden angels on the high brick ceiling. Divine.

Check out the Swedish royal family’s Tullgarn palace, famous for its Rococo interiors and English gardens.

The iconic Swedish designer Carl Malmsten opened his shop in 1940 and promoted rustic, simple furniture of quality craftsmanship and materials.

Echoing the scene outside, the interior is snow-white and theatrically lit.

A shrine to the whimsical patterned fabrics of the late Josef Frank, who became the store's designer in 1934. Choose from 45 of his vibrant animal, avian, or floral prints, and create a lampshade, sofa, or bag (the store will custom-make and ship your items home).

The Vasamuseet, located on Djurgarden, is the most popular museum in Sweden. It houses the Vasa, the oldest known completed ship, built in 1628 during the reign of King Gustavus Adolphus II.

The UNESCO World Heritage site, also known as Woodland Cemetery, is one of Stockholm's most surprising architectural landmarks. Its rolling pine forest landscape holds memorials designed by two of Sweden's most important Modernists, Sigurd Lewerentz and Gunnar Asplund.

Acne (Ambition to Create Novel Expression) began when Jonny Johansson gifted friends and relatives with 100 pairs of raw denim, red-stitched jeans. The fashion company then grew to 21 stores (called studios) worldwide, with the flagship studio on Norrmalmstorg and another in Gamla Stan.

Why It’s Cool: Frank Lloyd Wright used some guesswork to make sure Fallingwater didn’t fall; today, computers do the heavy lifting.

For cutting-edge Swedish labels, head to this 17th-century industrial building turned high-design mall. Browse the racks of denim at Dry Lake, or try on geometric-patterned jersey dresses at Whyred and skintight satin pants at Filippa K.

Launched last September by publishing powerhouse Bonnier, the 20,300-square-foot gallery is the latest addition to the city's art scene.

Busy Slussen square is Stockholm's answer to Grand Central. The main attraction here (besides a major subway stop) is the humble Nystekt Strömming (fried herring) wagon, encircled by picnic tables crowded with locals on their lunch break.

This shop carries an eclectic range of accessories by Swedish designers, including hand-printed dish towels and colorful kids' toys.