Sweden

Restaurants in Sweden

If Swedish restaurants are your first introduction to the country's cuisine, you'll find plenty of dishes that make the most of local produce, including berries and mushrooms foraged from the country's forest, but also fish, often served smoked, from the Baltic and North seas while reindeer and other game is more common in the country's north. The country has always been open to foreign influences, and it's not unusual to find French and Italian, and also Cambodian and Ethiopian, dishes at the best restaurants in Sweden.
Stockholm's acclaimed Operkälleran is one of these Sweden restaurants with an international focus to its menu. Housed in the 1895 building behind the Opera House, Operakallaren actually contains four restaurants, a cocktail bar, and event rooms. The main dining room has oak paneling, elaborate chandeliers, paintings by Oscar Bjorck, and large arched windows with views of the Royal Castle. Chef Stefano Catenacci serves Mediterranean cuisine, such as mushroom and black truffle risotto with an olive emulsion, scallops with sorrel sauce, and lamb sweetbreads with greens. The well-respected wine cellar contains 30,000 bottles.

At his minimalist restaurant, chef Magnus Ek prepares regionally sourced dishes like wild salmon and cockle tartare.

After major renovations in spring of 2011, local legend Pontus Frithiof reopened the multi-level Pontus!, located on Stureplan Square. An Asian-themed cocktail bar with carrara marble and copper details serves sushi, dim sum, and Swedish/Asian fusion cocktails.

After 11 p.m., the black-and-white–“walled pan-Asian restaurant turns into a nightclub with techno beats, sexy lighting, and a creatively named cocktail menu. Don't leave without trying a Polish Waitress: peach liqueur, Campari, lemon, sugar, and orange juice.

Restaurant Lux is off the beaten track on the island of Lilla Essingen and overlooks Marieberg Bay.

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Located in Norrmalm, Konstnarsbaren (meaning "Artist's Bar") is housed in an 1891 building designed as a late Gothic Venezian palace.

You can spend an entire night at this three-story restaurant, bar, and concert venue. Start with a cocktail at the standing-room-only Entrée lounge; then move upstairs, where long-haired, leather-booted hipsters chat beneath tulle-shaded lamps; the third floor hosts Stockholm's latest bands.

Wrap yourself in one of the restaurant's green fleece blankets as you dine among fashion plates and artist types. Try the potatoes and röding, a local fish.

Overlooking the Rosendalsvagen on the Djurgarden Island, the Wardshuset Ulla Windbladh restaurant is housed in an 1897 inn done in the Gustavian-style with white walls, an ornate doorway, and a peaked shingled roof.

The property is part café, park bakery, and part nursery, thanks to the on-site greenhouse where fruits and vegetables are grown. What the restaurant can't source itself, it purchases form local producers. Leftovers, naturally, are composted.

Plush red-velvet chairs furnish this glass box cantilevered high over the street below. Along with the views, the landmark restaurant serves refined local dishes like carpaccio of salmon with mango dressing, courtesy of celebrity chef Erik Lallerstedt.

 

Housed in the 1895 building behind the Opera House, Operakallaren contains four restaurants, a cocktail bar, and event rooms. The main dining room reflects the history of the building in the carved oak paneling, ornate chandeliers, paintings by Oscar Bjorck, and large arched windows.

Max

A cross between In-N-Out Burger and McDonald's, Max is a family-run Swedish fast-food chain that dates back to 1968. Now it has brought its brand of trans-fat-free, made-to-order Swedish burgers and crispy fries to the capital's airport (Terminal 4).