Restaurants in Sweden

Just a five-minute walk from Stureplan, this century-old restaurant is modeled after the famed Café Riche in Paris. Often packed with members of the local elite, the dim interior evokes old-fashioned glamour with long leather banquettes, gold-framed mirrors, and crystal chandeliers.

Wrap yourself in one of the restaurant's green fleece blankets as you dine among fashion plates and artist types. Try the potatoes and röding, a local fish.

Everything about Portofino is unassuming: its quiet location in Zinkensdamm, its nondescript brick exterior, and its short menu, which offers five appetizers, five primi piatti entrees, and four main courses.

Housed on the campus of the Royal Art Academy, Fredsgatan 12 (F12) is owned by well-known restaurateurs Melker Andersson and Danyel Couet.

Overlooking the Rosendalsvagen on the Djurgarden Island, the Wardshuset Ulla Windbladh restaurant is housed in an 1897 inn done in the Gustavian-style with white walls, an ornate doorway, and a peaked shingled roof.

Dark mood lighting, pulsing music, and friendly waiters keep this place packed. Nibble on Swedish hash browns with Balik salmon roe or veal with duck-liver sauce while you sip schnapps infused with fennel, cumin, and anise into the wee hours.

Named after one of Sweden's top chefs, the Mathias Dahlgren restaurant is located inside the 19th-century Grand Hôtel, which overlooks Riddarfjärden bay. The restaurant is divided into two distinct venues: the Michelin one-starred Matbaren and the two-starred Matsalen.

The property is part café, park bakery, and part nursery, thanks to the on-site greenhouse where fruits and vegetables are grown. What the restaurant can't source itself, it purchases form local producers. Leftovers, naturally, are composted.

Plush red-velvet chairs furnish this glass box cantilevered high over the street below. Along with the views, the landmark restaurant serves refined local dishes like carpaccio of salmon with mango dressing, courtesy of celebrity chef Erik Lallerstedt.


Owned by Danyel Couet and Melker Andersson of the F12 Group, Le Rouge in Gamla Stan is done in the fin de siècle Parisian-style of Moulin Rouge.

At his minimalist restaurant, chef Magnus Ek prepares regionally sourced dishes like wild salmon and cockle tartare.