Stockholm

Stockholm Travel Guide

For cutting-edge Swedish labels, head to this 17th-century industrial building turned high-design mall. Browse the racks of denim at Dry Lake, or try on geometric-patterned jersey dresses at Whyred and skintight satin pants at Filippa K.

Launched last September by publishing powerhouse Bonnier, the 20,300-square-foot gallery is the latest addition to the city's art scene.

Busy Slussen square is Stockholm's answer to Grand Central. The main attraction here (besides a major subway stop) is the humble Nystekt Strömming (fried herring) wagon, encircled by picnic tables crowded with locals on their lunch break.

H&M

The Swedish fashion company Hennes & Mauritz opened in 1947 and has since expanded to 2,300 stores in 41 countries. Of the Stockholm locations, this H&M in Norrmalm is the largest and receives the season's newest styles first.

Stockholm’s most exclusive club includes V, a 250-person VIP section.

Scottish owner Andrew Duncanson scours the globe for the best in vintage Scandinavian furniture for his shop in Östermalm. Serious design junkies are awed by the stock, including Wilhelm-Kage pottery and a limited-edition 1955 rosewood daybed by Helge Vestergaard Jensen.

The Moderna Museet, on the island of Skeppsholmen, is home to an extensive collection of modern and contemporary paintings, sketches, photography, films, and videos from Sweden and the international arts community.

The boutique (whose name means the House of Organic in Swedish) sells sophisticated clothing such as designer Camilla Norrback's wool knits and fine cotton dresses; tailored, chemical-free jackets from Stockholm-based designer Anja Hynynen; and founder Johanna Hofring's own linen shirts with croc

Open only from mid-December to mid-April, the Absolut Icebar, within the Icehotel in the small village of Jukkasjärvi, in northern Sweden, holds steady at around 23 degrees. Sure, it seems like every few months an ice bar pops up somewhere: even Vegas has one.

The spare storefront and neon sign on Sveavagen don't hint at the gifts and pieces of art to be found in the Society for Swedish Handicrafts (Svensk Hemslojd).

Take a tour of Grythyttan Vin, located in the rural northwest about three hours from Stockholm. The winery, started in 1999 by the Fritzell Brothers, produces both fruit and mulled wines and fruit vinegars—all from wild plants.

You can spend an entire night at this three-story restaurant, bar, and concert venue. Start with a cocktail at the standing-room-only Entrée lounge; then move upstairs, where long-haired, leather-booted hipsters chat beneath tulle-shaded lamps; the third floor hosts Stockholm's latest bands.

In existence since the 12th century, Gotgatan (Goth Street) is one of the longest streets in Soldermalm. The street begins at Slussen and the Stockholm Stadsmuseum (Stockholm City Museum) and ends at the Globen Arena. In between is a wide selection of pubs, restaurants, and shops.

The iconic Swedish designer Carl Malmsten opened his shop in 1940 and promoted rustic, simple furniture of quality craftsmanship and materials.

After 10 p.m., move on to Laroy, a decadent bar-club that pulls in a fashionable set.