Stockholm Travel Guide

You can spend an entire night at this three-story restaurant, bar, and concert venue. Start with a cocktail at the standing-room-only Entrée lounge; then move upstairs, where long-haired, leather-booted hipsters chat beneath tulle-shaded lamps; the third floor hosts Stockholm's latest bands.

In existence since the 12th century, Gotgatan (Goth Street) is one of the longest streets in Soldermalm. The street begins at Slussen and the Stockholm Stadsmuseum (Stockholm City Museum) and ends at the Globen Arena. In between is a wide selection of pubs, restaurants, and shops.

The iconic Swedish designer Carl Malmsten opened his shop in 1940 and promoted rustic, simple furniture of quality craftsmanship and materials.

After 10 p.m., move on to Laroy, a decadent bar-club that pulls in a fashionable set.

A vast selection of 20th-century Scandinavian and Italian housewares. Murano-glass vases by Gio Ponti and Bianconi line the walls, and vintage pieces, like a Swedish birchwood sofa from the 1929 Barcelona furniture World's Fair, fill the floor.

For off-the-map art, take a 15-minute cab ride to the workingclass neighborhood of Liljeholmen.

Three royal palaces—including Haga Palace, where the current monarch, King Carl XVI Gustaf, was born—can be found in this sprawling 6,700-acre conservation tract (complete with roe deer, owls, and pine martens) right in the center of the city.

Acne (Ambition to Create Novel Expression) began when Jonny Johansson gifted friends and relatives with 100 pairs of raw denim, red-stitched jeans. The fashion company then grew to 21 stores (called studios) worldwide, with the flagship studio on Norrmalmstorg and another in Gamla Stan.

After 11 p.m., the black-and-white–“walled pan-Asian restaurant turns into a nightclub with techno beats, sexy lighting, and a creatively named cocktail menu. Don't leave without trying a Polish Waitress: peach liqueur, Campari, lemon, sugar, and orange juice.

Don't leave Stockholm without indulging in a real Swedish massage. At Sturebadet, masseurs knead out knots in treatment rooms surrounding a 1902 Art Nouveau pool.

The market transforms an anonymous corner of the hip Södermalm neighborhood into a bustling weekend fair, filled with vendors selling everything from antique embroidered linens to exquisite wooden dolls by Swedish toymaker Fredrik Hillerborg.

A meal among the city’s elite in Café Opera a gilded and frescoed salon with a rich, seafood-heavy menu, is a must. Then head through to the Opera House to catch a performance.

This shop carries an eclectic range of accessories by Swedish designers, including hand-printed dish towels and colorful kids' toys.

Karl Lagerfeld was so smitten with the duo's jewelry that he snatched up 11 designs for one of his recent collections. Their first store opened last December, where standouts include 18-karat-gold chicken-bone necklaces and gold-plated cuffs with circular cutouts.