St. Petersburg

St. Petersburg Travel Guide

Explore the evolution of Russian and Western applied arts from the 16th through the early 20th centuries.

Founded by the royal family in 1744, the china here is literally fit for a czar.

This world-class museum is not to be missed, but where to start, with more than 350 rooms?Skip the lines by buying tickets online, then hit the highlights. Room 214: a diminutive duo of sublime Madonna paintings by Da Vinci, in one of the palace's most ornate chambers.

Well-priced caviar, vodka, and pickled herring are among the offerings at this gourmet food market, housed in a newly restored 1903 Art Nouveau building. It's the only grocer in town with antique bronze lamps and intricately patterned painted windows.

Housed in the Mikhailovsky Palace, the Russian works here—which include 6,000 religious icons—makes an interesting complement to the Hermitage's foreign treasures. Liszt and Berlioz gave private concerts in the impressive White Column Hall, a music parlor dating from the 1820's.


Keep quiet! Don't drink! Work harder! Clean up on bossy Soviet-era propaganda posters at this bookstore that also stocks English translations of the ultimate Petersburg tale, Crime and Punishment.

Russia's first private brewery occupies an industrial-chic space. The live rock shows, sports on TV, and beers on tap draw an enthusiastic crowd of all ages.

The hand-stitched cotton dresses with elaborate embroidery have a distinct air of yesteryear, and the designer displays her garments like museum objects.

Built in 1733 and capped with a distinctive golden needle, the 400-plus-foot spire is a landmark of the Petersburg skyline. It's also a mausoleum for Russia's royal family, containing the remains of every czar from Peter the Great on.