St. Bart's

Restaurants in St. Bart's


At this sidewalk café in the main port's ritzy shopping area, try the chef's expertly seasoned Greek plates, such as an airy puff pastry with caramelized onions and leeks.

Informal, funky, and family-friendly, the cafe has waterfront wooden tables shaded by sea-grape trees. Try crisp conch fritters, grilled fresh dorade, and a cold Carib beer while watching the kite surfing offshore.

Built around a 100-year-old tamarind tree, this open-air restaurant is located near the Baie de St.-Jean on the road to Grande Saline Beach.

Located within the luxury Hotel Guanahani on St. Barthelemy’s eastern coast, this upscale spot draws a dinner crowd for the innovative, French-Caribbean cuisine and romantic atmosphere.

Over-the-top is the only way to describe this bordello-style restaurant: during the nightly fashion show, lace- and boa-clad models gyrate to a pumping disco soundtrack.

Do yourself a favor and try the Creole cod fritters or the grilled spiny lobster at the hotel’s casual restaurant, with one of the best-priced menus on the island.

Located within the Eden Rock Hotel, exclusive (read as: reservations required) On-the-Rocks offers premium views of the turquoise waters of St. Jean Bay from its promontory location. The covered deck splits into three levels, so diners and drinkers can enjoy the views from virtually any seat.

While it isn't the height of glamour—picnic tables covered in plastic cloths, Christmas lights strung in the trees—this is the best bargain on the island. It's also one of the few spots to find authentic Creole dishes like goat stew and conch fritters.

Situated with views of Hotel Le Toiny’s infinity pool and the Caribbean beyond, Le Gaïac serves French cuisine with a Creole influence. Chef Stéphane Mazières prepares dishes like fresh fish grilled a la plancha (on a flat, metal grill) or roasted squab breast in a pie.

A misnomer, Shell Beach has, sadly, few shells. The sand itself (gray, rough) isn't top-quality, but the placid cove is ideal for kids. For a lunch of lemongrass shrimp, book a table on the second floor of the Asian-influenced Do Brazil.

La Petite Colombe, a neighborhood patisserie in Lorient (with locations in Gustavia and Colmbier, too), specializes in freshly baked breads and pastries including French baguettes, croissants, and pain au chocolat (a croissant-like pastry with chocolate).

Not far from St. Bart’s airport, Maya’s is both a takeaway restaurant and a gourmet food shop.

Situated on the Gustavia waterfront and run by a husband and wife team since 1984, Maya's Restaurant cooks up Creole tastes from seafood ingredients that vary daily.

Lobster salad with mango marmalade, house- made french fries, and vivaneau (red snapper) a la plancha are standouts at this hotel restaurant, where white canvas awnings add a nautical touch to open-air dining.

A short hike over a rocky path opens onto a wide, white-sand stretch. Depending on the winds, the water can be rough. For lunch, head to the open-air restaurant Le Grain de Sel, a five-minute drive away.