Spain

Things to do in Spain

Whether stopping for a quick city break or spending the summer’s months exploring the whole country, there are so many things to do in Spain.

The capital city Madrid offers tourists world class shopping, a plethora of art galleries and museums and a championship football team for soccer, but for many travellers Barcelona stands out as the must-see cultural epicenter. From Gaudí's fantastical buildings to the Museu Picasso De Barcelona there is so much to see and to do for culture junkies. The Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao is also worth a visit.

There are many more things to do in Spain outside the big cities. With 44 historic wonders, Spain has the 3rd most UNESCO World Heritage sites in the world. The Roman aqueduct at Segovia and Alhambra in Granada are just two that are worth visiting. Other natural wonders include the views of Ronda, Somiedo National Park and Las Medulas.

Wondering what to do in Spain for the adventure seeker? Snow or shine Spain offers world class skiing in the Sierra Nevada mountains, hiking in the Pyrenees, surfing in San Sebastian and mountain climbing and abseiling in the Parque Natural Sierra de Guara and the Parque Nacional de Ordesa. The beaches of the warm Mediterranean beaches of the Costa Del Sol are ideal for water sports.

From bull-running in Pamplona to the processions of Semana Santa, Spain still celebrates a number of traditional festivals throughout the year. A harlequin of colors and celebration, joining in the festivities is something every traveler should try to do.

With so much to choose from you will never be stuck for what to do next in Spain.

Established by Spanish financier and philanthropist Juan March in 1955, this namesake foundation  organizes free classical concerts in a multistory cultural center in the Salamanca neighborhood. Held in a 300-seat theater, the concerts feature chamber orchestras, choirs, and soloists.

Native painter Joaquín Sorolla was a contemporary and friend of John Singer Sargent, and the parallels in their paintings are immediately apparent. (They are so clear, in fact, that two years ago the Thyssen-Bornemisza mounted an entire show around their commonalities).

Workaholics want for nothing at this comprehensive business hub—which offers private meeting rooms, computer stations, copy and fax services, and even A/V equipment for rehearsing presentations. A $42 fee buys you full use of the facility for up to four hours.

Roger Davies runs this culinary tour company specializing in food and wine tours.

Founded by Javier Serra in 1987, En Línea Barcelona is one of the city’s most prestigious furniture and interior design stores. The store sells items from such high end designers as Knoll, Louis Poulsen, and Maxalto.

Slide into a leather booth at this watering hole and you'll be immersed in the chatty camaraderie of the professors, writers, artists, and theater types who live nearby in the streets surrounding the Meseu d'Art Contemporani.

You'll feel like you are floating above the city's tiled homes at the rooftop bar in the Hotel Larios. Enjoy a bird's-eye view of the illuminated cathedral and the Alcazaba as you sip a glass of bubbly cava.

What to Expect: Located partly on a peninsula near the old-but-still-working harbor in the traditional fisherman’s quarter of town, this three-quarter-mile-long family- and tourist-friendly beach was once a funky, working-class area with to-die-for seafood restaurants.

At the bustling main market, the stands heave with ripe fruits, cheeses, nuts, herbs, snails, and the garnet-red tuna, which is so prized by the Japanese that they wait offshore to snap up whatever they can from area fishermen.

It’s all about interior design at this store in the Eixample neighborhood. Housed in a striking historical building, Corium sells all the essentials you'd expect to find in a decorator's arsenal, from cushions and contemporary furniture to leather accessories and retro lamps.

Regarded by critics as the missing link between other Spanish art collections, the Thyssen’s pieces, purchased by the Spanish state from a private collector in 1992, represent a tremendous breadth of European painters from the 14th to 21st centuries.  Temporary exhibitions are frequently conducte