Spain Travel Guide

The word naftalina translates to naphthalene, the active ingredient in mothballs. The name seems almost unfitting of this store in the Grácia neighborhood. The trendy retailer stands out from the surrounding shops with its selection of handmade, designer women’s clothing.

This “concept store” is a design shop and hair salon that also sells clothing, books, and cosmetics.

Claim an outdoor table in the folksy Sarrià district’s stalwart bar and try the city’s definitive patatas bravas.

Jeweler Pedro del Río Macanaz has a refined-yet-adventurous eye, and it shows in his collection of exquisite brooches, from old-school pieces set with coral or cabochons to futuristic designs in delicate gold mesh.

Cereria Subirà claims to be the oldest shop in all of Barcelona, although no one can agree on when exactly it was founded, and it hasn’t always sold candles. This “waxery” (or cereria) stocks home accessories, most of which have something to do with generating light.

Picasso’s Guernica, depicting Franco’s bombing of civilians in Guernica during the civil war, one of the most celebrated antiwar paintings of all time, makes its permanent home here.

From Spanish monarchs and popes to sports stars and bullfighters, the Wax Museum displays more than 450 life-sized figures. Many are dressed in original clothing, including the likenesses of Cuba's Fidel Castro and Spanish dictator General Franco.

The property is a boutique, café, and theater all housed within a former brothel.

From slouchy, oversize carryalls to soft leather purses in the store's signature abanico (fan) shape, bags from Lupo are a Barcelona staple.

Housed in a 19th-century palace, the Museo Nacional de Artes Decorativas (National Museum of Decorative Arts) is located within the bank of museums northwest of the Buen Retiro Park.