Spain

Spain Travel Guide

With its smart red awnings, the CH Carolina Herrera boutique is located in a seven-story stone building in the Recoletos neighborhood.

Why It’s Cool: The first glimpse of Guggenheim Bilbao’s rippling titanium walls in 1997 was a game-changer. Never again would paintings be displayed in humdrum hallways.

Every Thursday, the Plaça de la Seu at the base of the massive 15th-century cathedral—the most famous edifice in Barcelona (not counting the Gaudís)—hosts an outdoor flea market.

Though largely gentrified thanks to the arrival of the Museu d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona and attendant galleries, the former slum of El Raval maintains a lively, global vibe.

Discos Castelló is an independent record store located in the Raval neighborhood. Established in the 1930’s, the shop is one of the oldest on Tallers Street, which is lined with stores selling music of all kinds.

Parts of this fortress-like cathedral date back to the 12th century. Much of the church was destroyed in a 1941 fire, but the 800-plus-year-old crypt escaped the blaze.

If you're after a one-stop fiesta, you'll find it here: Six separate spaces, including an open kitchen, a dining room, a casual café, a terrace bar, and a lounge, with dancing on weekends.

Large and modern, the cellar houses thousands of barrels, including ones signed by Spanish royalty, soccer stars, and actors; it's the Iberian equivalent of the signed head shots you see in Los Angeles dry cleaners - all the bodegas have them.

The six million specimens at the National Museum of Natural Sciences range from dinosaurs to Mediterranean flora. Founded by Carlos III in 1771, the original collections were displayed in the Royal Cabinet of Natural History.

This emblematic bar madrileño has old rock ’n’ roll posters on the walls. It’s been around forever.