Spain

Spain Travel Guide

On Sunday, as the hordes weave their way through the Rastro Flea Market, the savviest of shoppers flock instead to Alonso Ojeda for the collection of antique lithographs and maps, but especially for the frame-worthy hand-painted 1930s–1950s antique advertisements (35 euros, or about $45, each).

Don't miss the sangria at Rock Bar.

Antxón Gómez launched this legendary club in the 1980's.

Stylish leather shoes.

With the no-fuss charm of a warehouse sale, Non Stop is where locals come for an unparalleled selection of limited-edition sneakers by Adidas, Onitsuka Tiger, and Nike, among others.

Jerez is known as a center of Flamenco and you can get a good taste of the passionate dance at this tablao, a theater-tavern that attracts world-class performers.

Since opening in the early 1940's, this espadrilles emporium has sold a colorful variety of Catalonia's classic sandals - perfect for strolling city streets in style. Stripes, solids, embroidered, wedge-heeled: this 72-year-old Barri Gòtic cobbler makes all manner of espadrilles.

Designed by Ricardo Velázquez Bosco, the Palacio de Cristal (Crystal Palace) was built in the Buen Retiro Park in 1887 to house an exotic plant exhibit from the Philippines, then a Spanish colony.

The biggest of the airport’s nine VIP lounges (it sprawls over 21,000 square feet) is also the biggest in Spain.

Madrid’s Barajas Airport’s 2006 Terminal 4, by Richard Rogers of Rogers Stirk Harbour & Partners, is like an extra-long cathedral, an unending vault supported by a colorful procession of buttresses.

The Contemporary Culture Center of Barcelona is one of the city’s most prominent exhibition centers.

The icon of classical Spanish theater was long-neglected until a restoration in 1987 put it back on the map. Now, the venue draws top-name performers in classical and modern dance and music (from symphonies to Euro-pop to flamenco).