Restaurants in Spain

With its urban-chic décor and classic Catalan dishes such as a salad of tuna belly with Montserrat tomatoes.

Managed by acclaimed chef Martín Berasategui, this Michelin two-starred restaurant is located in the Hotel Condes de Barcelona, which comprises two 19th-century palaces on Passeig de Gràcia.

Order the saucy albóndigas with a glass of vermú de (vermouth on tap) slid across the antique onyx counter at Casa Alberto, in a building where Cervantes once wrote.

Located in El Palace Hotel, this Michelin one-starred restaurant serves French and Catalan fare from acclaimed chef Romain Fornell.

Part industrial-looking art gallery, part cooperatively run, vegetarian-friendly café (try the house-made spinach ravioli), La Báscula has one of the city's most idyllic sun-filled dining rooms.


The quiet dining room in L’Eixample experiments with a cuisine at the intersection of Vietnam, New Orleans, and Catalonia. The result: lamb carpaccio topped with caramelized ginger and green-apple relish, and dorado steamed in a banana leaf with coconut milk.

Pizza? In Spain? Absolutamente. If the toppings include delicious sobrasada sausage and the slowly fermented sourdough crust is featherlight. The pizzeria in question is theis mod, white-and-red newcomer opened by the avant-garde chef Jordi Vilà.

In a sleepy hamlet 35 miles west of Alicante, the chef at Paco Gandía layers rice in a pan the size of a bicycle tire, along with rabbit, tomatoes, saffron, and snails that feed on wild herbs. Licked by flames from an open fire, the paella is not just good—it’s near-mythical.

Part restaurant and part nightclub, Arola Madrid is located in the Museo Reina Sofia (Queen Sofia Museum), which houses a renowned collection of 20th-century art, including Picasso’s Guernica.

Located on the shaded Plaza de la Paja, Delic muddles mojitos that are considered among the best in the city.

Known for its market-sourced Mediterranean cuisine, Chantarella is headed by chef-brothers Álvaro and Enrique Díaz. The brothers opened the restaurant on Calle Luisa Fernanda in 1999 and moved to this larger space after two years.

Housed in a former dairy, La Vaquería de Suiza (The Swiss Dairy) smartly changed nothing about the original structure, with its unfinished cement floors and soaring 19th-century glass double doors, but added mismatched rough-hewn wood tables and chairs.