Spain

Restaurants in Spain

Try the ethereal lacy fritura of baby squid.

Moo

The ever-creative Roca brothers have made the Zen-like restaurant in the Hotel Omm a local favorite for haute Catalan cuisine (think, slow-cooked baby goat in a rosemary honey glaze).

This Granadan newcomer incorporates Moroccan spices like coriander and cumin in its grilled bacalao. Book a table near the windows for a view of the Alhambra walls.

The restaurant serves traditional Catalonian seafood dishes at a reasonable price.

El Bulli–trained chef Roger Martínez takes rice on a global adventure at his Eixample spot. Can’t choose between the classic Catalán rabbit rice and a new-wave risotto?Kick off your meal with some terrific tapitas, followed by the well-priced arroz tasting menu.

The gratinéed macaroni timbale by chef Carles Gaig, of the Michelin-starred Gaig, will go a long way toward easing the pain of departure.

It may not look like much, but Cisne Azul, steps from Plaza de Chueca, is a mecca for all sorts of exotic mushrooms (to eat, that is).

The seafood is excellent and the setting romantic at this restaurant on a hidden stone terrace in the Old Town.

Computer screens light up with the 3,500-label wine list at Monvínic, a wine bar and restaurant featuring communcal tables and an unfinished oak–and–stainless steel interior.

20 kinds of Mediterranean sea creatures—from humble sardines to live langoustines—glisten on ice, awaiting a gentle bath in hot olive oil or a brief stint on the plancha. On busy days Universal does 500 covers, which doesn’t affect the precision of its preparations.

A manairó is defined in Catalan as a Pyrenean elf who might secretly complete a cobbler’s work overnight—and owner-chef Jordi Herrera might well be employing a culinary elf or two in his always surprising kitchen.