Restaurants in Spain

The current insider favorite among Madrid’s food and wine elite, Senzone, at the new Hospes hotel in Barrio de Salamanca, brings together the unique talents of 27-year-old chef Francisco Morales—a protégé of avant-garde guru Andoni Aduriz, of San Sebastián’s Mugaritz—and his wife, Rut Cotroneo, t

This is tapas for grown-ups who like to sit down—if they can get a seat (reservations are a must). A huge bar takes up much of the main dining room, and tables are in high demand.

Known for its namesake drink - arguably the best in Europe -
L'Eixample's Dry Martini has all the trappings of a classic film-noir
set: emerald-green leather banquettes, white-jacketed waiters, and
plenty of intrigue.

El Bulli's Ferran Adrià, the chef who helped put Spain on the culinary map, has set his sights on the burger joint. His Fast Good serves quick bites—hamburgers with olive tapenade, fries cooked in Spanish olive oil—in a futuristic green and purple storefront in Madrid.

Chef Francesc Gimeno Manduley’s low-cost, high-concept miniatures are a marvel of ingenuity.

A Barcelona institution, Bar Pinotxo is located inside the Mercat de la Boqueria. This small tapas bar is owned and operated by Juanito Bayen. The cuisine is Catalan, and there is no menu; Juan or a server will simply spout off the day’s offerings.

Chef Willy Moya serves an olive-oil inflected tasting menu at this Seville restaurant.

A tiny corridor of a place where embuchados, plates of grilled goat tripe, sizzling and crunchy, with spicy romesco sauce ($6.40) are served with Bodegas Solana de Ramírez Ruíz Valsarte Crianza 2002. The wine is full of sweetness and round in the mouth ($1.80).

The cacophony is part of the charm at Cordoba's El Caballo Rojo, an incessantly popular Andalusian dining spot done in modern mujedar style in this melting-pot city where Arab, Christian, and Sephardic Jewish cultures have rubbed shoulders (occasionally the wrong way) for centuries.

This small restaurant near Montjuc transports diners to Venice with its authentic Italian fare. The menu includes homemade pastas, seafood, including cuttlefish and scallops, and classic Italian desserts like tiramisu.

The city’s only Michelin-starred restaurant earns the honor with simple riffs on traditional Andalusian fare, such as ajo blanco, a chilled almond and garlic soup topped with a red-wine granita.

Located on a quiet side street just north of the Teatro Real (Royal Theatre), this family-owned tavern is renowned for its signature cocido madrileño (Madrilenian stew), a house specialty since the restaurant opened in 1870.

The world’s oldest operating restaurant, founded in 1725, Restaurante Botín still roasts suckling pig and lamb in the original oak-fired, cast-iron oven.