Restaurants in Spain

With only four tables, calling ahead is necessary for this bright tapas bar. Located near the Metro Sant Antoni stop, this spot specializes in traditional Catalonian tapas.

Hot cocoa goes haute at this sleek shop and café part-owned by Ferran Adrià’s pastry-chef brother, Albert. Dark and dense, the liquid easily qualifies as an alternative energy source. The chocolate-smeared tostada might be overkill, but have it anyway.

The perfect Sunday lunch means a seat at the counter and a plate of La Clara’s canelons de la casa (house cannelloni).

Enter the converted 19th century mill (molino is Spanish for mill) through a tunnel, and order from a menu of Castilian dishes cooked in a wood-burning oven. Wooden beams sit above a butter-toned dining room with exposed stone walls.

Located in the basement of the Hotel Miguel Angel, La Broche opened in 2000 under star chef Sergi Arola (a disciple of Ferran Adrià). Arola has since moved on, but his one-time student Angel Palacios now heads the Michelin-starred restaurant.

A weathered 1940’s zinc bar with beautiful azulejos of orange groves on the walls. And to eat, freshly baked Antequera rolls stuffed with salt-cured pork loin and apples, or mounted with Cantabrian anchovies under squiggles of condensed milk.

Known for its namesake drink - arguably the best in Europe -
L'Eixample's Dry Martini has all the trappings of a classic film-noir
set: emerald-green leather banquettes, white-jacketed waiters, and
plenty of intrigue.

This no-frills taberna in the Chamberí district is the unofficial clubhouse for the capital’s food and art crowds, and chef, journalist, and TV personality Alberto Fernández Bombín is your ultimate hipster host.

Pastry pioneer Jordi Butrón keeps his cool gray, 30-seat, minimalist atelier packed with fans of his all-dessert three- and five-course tasting menus. Expect inspired sweet-savory flavor combos: pear “crackling” and fennel shoots; or chocolate, smoked-tea, and yogurt ice cream.

An old-fashioned sweet shop established in 1842, Casa Mira is renowned for its homemade turrón, a traditional Christmas nougat made with almonds, sugar, honey, and egg whites. The shop sells the holiday candy year-round and even supplies the Spanish royal family.

Owned by former TV chef Darío Barrio, this trendy Salamanca restaurant is set in a 19th-century coalbunker renovated by Barrio’s architect brothers. Inside the unmarked building, a staircase leads down to a cellar of whitewashed brick walls, tall archways, and cool-tone lighting.

The taberna offers a warm salad of partridge and bitter greens scattered with pomegranate seeds.