Spain

Restaurants in Spain

Whether you're looking for light tapas, hearty seafood Paella or a gourmet dining experiences in the Basque country, you can find restaurants in Spain to cater to your culinary needs.

Spain's most popular dining category is tapas, which are typically small servings of cured meats, olives and cheeses, grilled squid or meatballs. There are regional variations of tapas, for example pintxos are small plates served in the north. You will find some of the best tapas restaurants in Spain in Madrid, San Sebastian and Seville.

Other Spain restaurants to try include asadores, which specialize in grilled meats and marisquerías, which serve fish and seafood.

Some of the best restaurants in Spain are now some of the best restaurants, with the now closed el Bullí putting Spain on the map as a culinary destination. It is possible to find great food all over the country, but Valencia, Barcelona, San Sebastian, Andalucía and Seville are among the best cities in Spain for a foodie holiday.

Chef Francesc Gimeno Manduley’s low-cost, high-concept miniatures are a marvel of ingenuity.

A Barcelona institution, Bar Pinotxo is located inside the Mercat de la Boqueria. This small tapas bar is owned and operated by Juanito Bayen. The cuisine is Catalan, and there is no menu; Juan or a server will simply spout off the day’s offerings.

Chef Willy Moya serves an olive-oil inflected tasting menu at this Seville restaurant.

A tiny corridor of a place where embuchados, plates of grilled goat tripe, sizzling and crunchy, with spicy romesco sauce ($6.40) are served with Bodegas Solana de Ramírez Ruíz Valsarte Crianza 2002. The wine is full of sweetness and round in the mouth ($1.80).

The cacophony is part of the charm at Cordoba's El Caballo Rojo, an incessantly popular Andalusian dining spot done in modern mujedar style in this melting-pot city where Arab, Christian, and Sephardic Jewish cultures have rubbed shoulders (occasionally the wrong way) for centuries.

This small restaurant near Montjuc transports diners to Venice with its authentic Italian fare. The menu includes homemade pastas, seafood, including cuttlefish and scallops, and classic Italian desserts like tiramisu.

The city’s only Michelin-starred restaurant earns the honor with simple riffs on traditional Andalusian fare, such as ajo blanco, a chilled almond and garlic soup topped with a red-wine granita.

Most Barcelona bars shut down on Sunday nights—which is why Alta Taberna Paco Meralgo is so indispensable. Plus, Paco serves Barcelona’s greatest tomato bread: a flat, split, porous roll grilled to a perfect crunch and slathered with pink, frothy tomato pulp.

Dinner for two $91.

Akin to (but a bit more polished than) the Sbarro chain found in many American airports, this cafeteria-style eatery serves up Italian fast-food staples: pizza by the slice with a variety of toppings, red-sauce pastas like lasagna and baked ziti. Grab and go or sit and stay—it’s your choice.

Join the businessmen and fishermen for lunch or an apertivo at this wonderfully airy spot known for its tortillas (Spanish-style omelets) and montaditos—little toasts topped with an array of delicacies, like tender sardines.