Spain

Restaurants in Spain

Whether you're looking for light tapas, hearty seafood Paella or a gourmet dining experiences in the Basque country, you can find restaurants in Spain to cater to your culinary needs.

Spain's most popular dining category is tapas, which are typically small servings of cured meats, olives and cheeses, grilled squid or meatballs. There are regional variations of tapas, for example pintxos are small plates served in the north. You will find some of the best tapas restaurants in Spain in Madrid, San Sebastian and Seville.

Other Spain restaurants to try include asadores, which specialize in grilled meats and marisquerías, which serve fish and seafood.

Some of the best restaurants in Spain are now some of the best restaurants, with the now closed el Bullí putting Spain on the map as a culinary destination. It is possible to find great food all over the country, but Valencia, Barcelona, San Sebastian, Andalucía and Seville are among the best cities in Spain for a foodie holiday.

This new brasserie from Barcelona’s hautest chef, Carles Gaig, is perfection, from the sprawling room that’s both cozy and cool to the nuevo catalán menu. Open since 2007, Fonda has already achieved a cult status.

Star chef Andrés Madrigal is at the top of his game creating nouveau-Spanish dishes for his 75-euro tasting menu (about $96; à la carte is also available), which starts with a series of amuse-bouches, such as a Bloody Mary with Parmesan foam served in a shot glass.

Since 1929, this El Born district bar has been serving tapas such as patatas bravas, fresh anchovies in vinegar, and butifarra, a Catalan sausage. The specialty of the house though is chipirónescon mongetes, a warm plate of baby squid and light beans. To accompany meals

Catalan chef Sergi Arola—from Michelin two-starred Sergi Arola Gastro in Madrid—opened this tapas restaurant at the Hotel Arts in Olympic Village, in 2004. Located on the second floor, the terrace has prime views of Frank Gehry's bronze whale sculpture and Barceloneta Beach.

A weathered 1940’s zinc bar with beautiful azulejos of orange groves on the walls. And to eat, freshly baked Antequera rolls stuffed with salt-cured pork loin and apples, or mounted with Cantabrian anchovies under squiggles of condensed milk.

With only four tables, calling ahead is necessary for this bright tapas bar. Located near the Metro Sant Antoni stop, this spot specializes in traditional Catalonian tapas.

The past lives on at this historic haunt where actual fishermen order up salt-cod croquettes at a tatty old marble counter. Twenty dollars buys grilled sardines, terrific bacalao fritters, and bomba, a crisp meat-and-mashed-potato cannonball doused in an explosively fiery sauce.

The perfect Sunday lunch means a seat at the counter and a plate of La Clara’s canelons de la casa (house cannelloni).

Hot cocoa goes haute at this sleek shop and café part-owned by Ferran Adrià’s pastry-chef brother, Albert. Dark and dense, the liquid easily qualifies as an alternative energy source. The chocolate-smeared tostada might be overkill, but have it anyway.

Enter the converted 19th century mill (molino is Spanish for mill) through a tunnel, and order from a menu of Castilian dishes cooked in a wood-burning oven. Wooden beams sit above a butter-toned dining room with exposed stone walls.

Located in the basement of the Hotel Miguel Angel, La Broche opened in 2000 under star chef Sergi Arola (a disciple of Ferran Adrià). Arola has since moved on, but his one-time student Angel Palacios now heads the Michelin-starred restaurant.