Spain

Restaurants in Spain

Whether you're looking for light tapas, hearty seafood Paella or a gourmet dining experiences in the Basque country, you can find restaurants in Spain to cater to your culinary needs.

Spain's most popular dining category is tapas, which are typically small servings of cured meats, olives and cheeses, grilled squid or meatballs. There are regional variations of tapas, for example pintxos are small plates served in the north. You will find some of the best tapas restaurants in Spain in Madrid, San Sebastian and Seville.

Other Spain restaurants to try include asadores, which specialize in grilled meats and marisquerías, which serve fish and seafood.

Some of the best restaurants in Spain are now some of the best restaurants, with the now closed el Bullí putting Spain on the map as a culinary destination. It is possible to find great food all over the country, but Valencia, Barcelona, San Sebastian, Andalucía and Seville are among the best cities in Spain for a foodie holiday.

In front of you sits a napoleon of caramelized foie gras, mackerel, and roasted pepper—an intricate sweet-savory morsel the size of a silver dollar.

The establishment’s sole victual—a two-inch-high stack of mushrooms precariously united by a toothpick and topped with a tiny shrimp ($1.50)—pairs perfectly with Bodegas Lan Crianza 2004. It’s a classic Rioja that impresses with elegance, not fruit ($1.90).

The dramatic stark-black design is a refreshing departure from the woody cubbyhole look of traditional pintxo bars (in the back there’s a little red-and-white restaurant).

Pied piper Pep Manubens has been pulling off culinary magic in this slender slot of a restaurant for the last quarter century. The formula is simple: squeeze through the door and enjoy a bottle of Albariño while you wait for some of the city’s best tapas.

Deeper into the market, Ana Gambeta, of the tourist-friendly Bar Central, hawks her baked dorada (bream), her butifarra sausage with white beans, and her tripe casserole—in five languages. "Israelis and Palestinians eat at my counter, shoulder to shoulder," Gambeta boasts.

Tiny squid, which are brought in from down the street, are fried with wild garlic, and local spring lamb is served with tumbet, the rich Majorcan stew of potato and eggplant.

Easily the swankiest dining option at the airport, El Madroño is set outside Terminal 4’s security area—so it’s the best place to have a pre-board meal with friends or business associates who aren’t traveling with you.

Imagine an old neighborhood joint updated in white Corian for the hipster generation and you’ve got Las Olas. The standout seafood tapas are prepared in a bustling open kitchen.