Spain

Restaurants in Spain

Order the almond gazpacho and fabulous minted lamb meatballs at Enrique Becerra, whose owner researches old Moorish recipes.

This smart urban grill house flanks the Santiago Bernabéu stadium with a sweeping view of the pitch.

The lunch spot has a real Valencian making the paella.

With tables at the edge of the beach and views out into the Mediterranean, this popular, family-run seafood and rice specialist dating from the late 1960s ranks high on any short list of Barceloneta dining spots.

Sherries drawn straight from barrels are accompanied by Andalusian olives and nuts roasted in a wood-burning oven.

Housed in the renovated Santa Caterina Market, this casual eatery serves four types of cuisine: Asian, Mediterranean, Italian, and vegetarian.

Owned by self-taught chef and film historian Abraham García, this small Mediterranean restaurant is named after a 1961 Luis Buñuel movie.

Since 2004, the Canadian-Catalan Artal family has engineered a big success in this clean-lined, minimalist space, appealing to hip, young locals with Catalan products and original cookery, and to visitors with explanations of recipes and wines in the language of Shakespeare.

A multilevel, multifunctional Philippe Starck–designed fun house—it’s really two restaurants, a basement dance club, and a throbbing scene around the black etched-glass bar.

A classic bodega in every sense of the word, La Cova Fumada is a small, unassuming, family-run eatery serving authentic Spanish cuisine. The restaurant puts on no airs at all — there are no signs denoting its presence, and there is no formal menu.

Known more for its wine selection than its Mediterranean menu, this lunch-only bistro is located on the mezzanine of a Salamanca wine shop that stocks about 4,500 labels. Inside, the dining room’s pearl tones and dark wood contrast with the more casual high-tops and red chairs in the bar.

Don’t bother braving the white-hot dinner scene at this 1933 landmark reopened in 2009 with local superstar Carles Abellán.