Restaurants in Spain

the lavish five-dozen-plus-item pintxos menu requires hours of complicated assembly on the part of owner Patxi Bergara.

Family-run spot popular with locals for its classic half-sandwich of grilled sardines topped with guindillo pepper ($2). The tart Bodegas Solagüen Crianza 2003 knifes through the oil and spice ($1.65).

Tasting menu for two $528.

Do the prefix dinenr of eclectic cuisine served around the communal table at the arty yet homey spot.

The name means “dark door,” but stepping in off the sultry streets into the over-the-top baroque salon—be it for coffee or the Benedictine-spiked house cocktail—will lighten your mood. Make like the Spaniards and pair your apertivo with plump olives or toasted marcona almonds.

First opened in 1894, Chocolatería San Ginés is renowned for its churros con chocolate — deep fried pastries served with a cup of thick dipping chocolate.

Among the old fishermen’s houses of Barceloneta, this sepia-toned cervecería is full of local sea dogs and other salty types who come for house-brewed lager and a dizzying array of tapas (boat-fresh squid and shrimp; flash-fried padrón peppers).