Spain

Restaurants in Spain

At star power of El Bulli’s former chef de cuisine Albert Raurich's latest opening, the setup is half the fun: you enter a traditional tapas bar (it’s actually new) in the Raval quarter.

The museum holds a modest restaurant, decorated with old black iron hydraulic olive presses and several scales.

Order tortilla española—runny like a good omelette and slathered with house-made red sauce ($2)—and chase it with the neighborhood’s best bargain: Bodegas Prudencio Larrea’s Los Porrones de Nedurp 2006 (90 cents).

Order featherlight tempura of baby vegetables highlighted with a sweet-tart reduction of sherry vinegar.

A fine-dining institution since 1967, Via Veneto uses fresh ingredients from the Mediterranean coast in its authentic Catalan cuisine. Helmed by the father-and-son team of José and Pedro Monje, the restaurant's interior is elegant, with Jacquard fabrics, heavy drapery, and jewel-toned accents.

This family-run classic is known for using seasonal delicacies—autumnal wild mushrooms, salt cod during Lent, local tuna in high summer—and preparing them in as many as a dozen variations to highlight the star ingredients.

The restaurant features a blend of seafood and fresh countryside ingredients and is helmed by a local celebrity cookbook author.

The Valhalla of fresh-anchovy dishes.