Spain

Restaurants in Spain

Whether you're looking for light tapas, hearty seafood Paella or a gourmet dining experiences in the Basque country, you can find restaurants in Spain to cater to your culinary needs.

Spain's most popular dining category is tapas, which are typically small servings of cured meats, olives and cheeses, grilled squid or meatballs. There are regional variations of tapas, for example pintxos are small plates served in the north. You will find some of the best tapas restaurants in Spain in Madrid, San Sebastian and Seville.

Other Spain restaurants to try include asadores, which specialize in grilled meats and marisquerías, which serve fish and seafood.

Some of the best restaurants in Spain are now some of the best restaurants, with the now closed el Bullí putting Spain on the map as a culinary destination. It is possible to find great food all over the country, but Valencia, Barcelona, San Sebastian, Andalucía and Seville are among the best cities in Spain for a foodie holiday.

After a day of sight-seeing, grab a drink on the patio at this tapas bar in the shadow of the Santa Maria del Mar church.

Located beside the art gallery Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Paradís serves Mediterranean seafood dishes and hosts themed culinary workshops about ingredients like local mushrooms, codfish, and calçots, a type of green onion.

The decibel level can shake plaster off the walls—then again, a great Andalusian bar routine is as frenzied as corrida moves are slow and controlled.

This self-serve restaurant styles itself after Madrid’s historic central square, with wrought-iron lampposts, marble-topped dining tables, and etched-glass vintagey-looking signs. The fare includes traditional Spanish dishes, such as paella, bean stew, and veal brochette.

Just off Passeig de Gracia, the city’s Art Nouveau shopping street, Tapaç 24 is great for a breakfast of bocadillos (sandwiches) and cafe con leche.

This small restaurant near Montjuc transports diners to Venice with its authentic Italian fare. The menu includes homemade pastas, seafood, including cuttlefish and scallops, and classic Italian desserts like tiramisu.

The cacophony is part of the charm at Cordoba's El Caballo Rojo, an incessantly popular Andalusian dining spot done in modern mujedar style in this melting-pot city where Arab, Christian, and Sephardic Jewish cultures have rubbed shoulders (occasionally the wrong way) for centuries.

The city’s only Michelin-starred restaurant earns the honor with simple riffs on traditional Andalusian fare, such as ajo blanco, a chilled almond and garlic soup topped with a red-wine granita.

El Bulli's Ferran Adrià, the chef who helped put Spain on the culinary map, has set his sights on the burger joint. His Fast Good serves quick bites—hamburgers with olive tapenade, fries cooked in Spanish olive oil—in a futuristic green and purple storefront in Madrid.