Spain

Restaurants in Spain

This self-serve restaurant styles itself after Madrid’s historic central square, with wrought-iron lampposts, marble-topped dining tables, and etched-glass vintagey-looking signs. The fare includes traditional Spanish dishes, such as paella, bean stew, and veal brochette.

Just off Passeig de Gracia, the city’s Art Nouveau shopping street, Tapaç 24 is great for a breakfast of bocadillos (sandwiches) and cafe con leche.

After a day of sight-seeing, grab a drink on the patio at this tapas bar in the shadow of the Santa Maria del Mar church.

The decibel level can shake plaster off the walls—then again, a great Andalusian bar routine is as frenzied as corrida moves are slow and controlled.

Located beside the art gallery Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Paradís serves Mediterranean seafood dishes and hosts themed culinary workshops about ingredients like local mushrooms, codfish, and calçots, a type of green onion.

Enter the converted 19th century mill (molino is Spanish for mill) through a tunnel, and order from a menu of Castilian dishes cooked in a wood-burning oven. Wooden beams sit above a butter-toned dining room with exposed stone walls.

Located in the basement of the Hotel Miguel Angel, La Broche opened in 2000 under star chef Sergi Arola (a disciple of Ferran Adrià). Arola has since moved on, but his one-time student Angel Palacios now heads the Michelin-starred restaurant.

A weathered 1940’s zinc bar with beautiful azulejos of orange groves on the walls. And to eat, freshly baked Antequera rolls stuffed with salt-cured pork loin and apples, or mounted with Cantabrian anchovies under squiggles of condensed milk.

Catalan chef Sergi Arola—from Michelin two-starred Sergi Arola Gastro in Madrid—opened this tapas restaurant at the Hotel Arts in Olympic Village, in 2004. Located on the second floor, the terrace has prime views of Frank Gehry's bronze whale sculpture and Barceloneta Beach.