Spain

Restaurants in Spain

Whether you're looking for light tapas, hearty seafood Paella or a gourmet dining experiences in the Basque country, you can find restaurants in Spain to cater to your culinary needs.

Spain's most popular dining category is tapas, which are typically small servings of cured meats, olives and cheeses, grilled squid or meatballs. There are regional variations of tapas, for example pintxos are small plates served in the north. You will find some of the best tapas restaurants in Spain in Madrid, San Sebastian and Seville.

Other Spain restaurants to try include asadores, which specialize in grilled meats and marisquerías, which serve fish and seafood.

Some of the best restaurants in Spain are now some of the best restaurants, with the now closed el Bullí putting Spain on the map as a culinary destination. It is possible to find great food all over the country, but Valencia, Barcelona, San Sebastian, Andalucía and Seville are among the best cities in Spain for a foodie holiday.

Located on a quiet side street just north of the Teatro Real (Royal Theatre), this family-owned tavern is renowned for its signature cocido madrileño (Madrilenian stew), a house specialty since the restaurant opened in 1870.

The world’s oldest operating restaurant, founded in 1725, Restaurante Botín still roasts suckling pig and lamb in the original oak-fired, cast-iron oven.

Most Barcelona bars shut down on Sunday nights—which is why Alta Taberna Paco Meralgo is so indispensable. Plus, Paco serves Barcelona’s greatest tomato bread: a flat, split, porous roll grilled to a perfect crunch and slathered with pink, frothy tomato pulp.

Dinner for two $91.

Akin to (but a bit more polished than) the Sbarro chain found in many American airports, this cafeteria-style eatery serves up Italian fast-food staples: pizza by the slice with a variety of toppings, red-sauce pastas like lasagna and baked ziti. Grab and go or sit and stay—it’s your choice.

Join the businessmen and fishermen for lunch or an apertivo at this wonderfully airy spot known for its tortillas (Spanish-style omelets) and montaditos—little toasts topped with an array of delicacies, like tender sardines.

The tortilla, the seafood noodles, and the dreamy crushed-potato salad drenched in olive oil are better than ever. Since the owner’s son took over and moved the bar here, the place has snapped into focus.