Spain

Restaurants in Spain

In 1974, restaurateur Lucio Blásquez opened this eponymous two-story restaurant specializing in Castilian cuisine prepared in a coal-fired oven, and it’s been a Madrid mainstay ever since.

Order the messy, spicy, tomatoey snail casserole as you peruse the faded bullfighting posters.

This Catalan, Michelin-starred restaurant was founded by chef-owner Carles Gaig’s great grandmother, in 1896. Originally located in Horta at a 19th-century inn, Gaig moved to the current space at the Hotel Cram in downtown’s Eixample District, in 2004.

A favorite haunt of the literary set, this retro 1970's-era restaurant and bar - note the fantasy-forest décor - prides itself on classic (and generously poured) cocktails, and excellent wine list, and keeping the party going until the city's mandatory 3 a.m. closing time.

Atxen Jiménez, the gorgeous sixtysomething grande dame of Spanish gastronomy, is the magnetic star of this busy, clean-lined dining room on the main square of Tafalla, a town in Navarra, in northern Spain.

This meringue-white L’Eixample storefront belongs to Rafa Peña, the 32-year-old current leader of Spain’s bistronomic movement. Reservations are in high demand, and with good reason with dishes like “souffléed” egg with cured ham cream.

Inside the tiled Barri Gòtic bodega, order fried sardines and the refreshing tomato-and-onion salad that inspired a similar dish at Inopia.

Can't find reservations in all of Barcelona?There’s always the stupendous mound of fried rabbit and caramelized garlic at the rustic gem called Taverna Can Margarit, in the folksy Poble Sec neighborhood.

Madrid’s gastronomic god Sergi Arola opened this low-key long, earth-toned space that seems oddly sedate for a rocker turned chef.

On a quiet corner off one of La Latina’s busy tapas-hopping thoroughfares, Almendro 13 is far from undiscovered—in fact, it buzzes. But that’s part of its allure.

Just weeks after the launch, adventurous epicures were flocking to the drab Tetuán neighborhood to eat at this 20-seat spot, where pink runners on tables are the only visible stab at “décor.” Influenced both by his apprenticeship at London’s Hakkasan and by Ferran Adrià’s deconstructive cuisine,