Spain

Hotels in Spain

A stone-and-glass town house in the Modernist Gràcia district with 34 natural-toned rooms with floor-to-ceiling windows and two Belle Époque–era suites with frescoes.

The hotel is the last Art Nouveau hotel still in operation in Barcelona. The 96 plush guestrooms are done up in shades of café con leche in this 1908 landmark building, the last designed by Lluis Domènech i Montaner.

All 170 rooms are modern, with architectural lighting; Nos. 902, 903, and 904 have teakwood terraces overlooking downtown Madrid.

The 65-room hotel was completely overhauled in July 2006, transforming from an outdated hotel into a stylish business-meets-beach haven. Rooms are equipped with free Wi-Fi (rare in Spain), sleek wooden furniture, oversize windows, and porcelain bathrooms.

The two flights of stairs (no elevator!) that lead to 7 Colors might dissuade the unadventurous, but the hotel’s bright, industrial rooms are worth the climb. Each one—down to the soap—is decorated in a single color.

A 125-room hostelry overlooking the town and bay.

When Valencia won the bid to host the 2007 America’s Cup, there wasn’t a single hotel on the waterfront near where the races are to be held. Since then, developers have scrambled to build ocean-side accommodations to suit the city’s new profile.

Built in 1929 to host the Spanish king’s crowned cohorts, Seville’s Hotel Alfonso XIII has never abdicated its role as the city’s premier address for discerning visitors.

While Madrid's other hotels trumpet the names of celebrity guests, Santo Mauro zealously guards their privacy—a definite draw for movie stars, statesmen, and one Seattle software tycoon.

Old-fashioned Hollywood glamour—with a touch of Almodóvar camp—inspired the public spaces and the 116 guest rooms, each decorated with photos of silent-era stars, vampy lipstick-red accents, and cutout patterns on the wall that evoke Spanish lace.

Both a hotel and a working winery, Arzuaga is situated on a 3,460-acre estate in the Duero river valley, surrounded by scenic vineyards and a private game reserve. The stone façade echoes classical Spanish architecture, with a long portico and a central bell tower.