Hotels in Spain

While Madrid's other hotels trumpet the names of celebrity guests, Santo Mauro zealously guards their privacy—a definite draw for movie stars, statesmen, and one Seattle software tycoon.

Old-fashioned Hollywood glamour—with a touch of Almodóvar camp—inspired the public spaces and the 116 guest rooms, each decorated with photos of silent-era stars, vampy lipstick-red accents, and cutout patterns on the wall that evoke Spanish lace.

A 125-room hostelry overlooking the town and bay.

When Valencia won the bid to host the 2007 America’s Cup, there wasn’t a single hotel on the waterfront near where the races are to be held. Since then, developers have scrambled to build ocean-side accommodations to suit the city’s new profile.

Built in 1929 to host the Spanish king’s crowned cohorts, Seville’s Hotel Alfonso XIII has never abdicated its role as the city’s premier address for discerning visitors.

Single-story cubical structures set against an austere, windswept landscape in northeastern Spain: the Hotel Aire de Bardenas has the feel at first glance of a lunar encampment.

A restored farmhouse on a traditional estate, the property has 12 cottages as well as endless orange, pear, and apple groves.

Both a hotel and a working winery, Arzuaga is situated on a 3,460-acre estate in the Duero river valley, surrounded by scenic vineyards and a private game reserve. The stone façade echoes classical Spanish architecture, with a long portico and a central bell tower.

Depending on whom you talk to, the architecture critic at El País or the Elciego shopkeeper, Frank Gehry’s hotel at the Herederos del Marqués de Riscal winery erupts with sublime grace or horrific violence.

With its clean lines and unpretentious look, Juli Capella’s Hotel Omm projects an incandescent warmth. The interiors, created by Sandra Tarruella and Isabel López, set pale woods in bright, airy rooms against moody, barely lit hallways and stylish lobby areas.