Spain

Things to do in Spain

Whether stopping for a quick city break or spending the summer’s months exploring the whole country, there are so many things to do in Spain.

The capital city Madrid offers tourists world class shopping, a plethora of art galleries and museums and a championship football team for soccer, but for many travellers Barcelona stands out as the must-see cultural epicenter. From Gaudí's fantastical buildings to the Museu Picasso De Barcelona there is so much to see and to do for culture junkies. The Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao is also worth a visit.

There are many more things to do in Spain outside the big cities. With 44 historic wonders, Spain has the 3rd most UNESCO World Heritage sites in the world. The Roman aqueduct at Segovia and Alhambra in Granada are just two that are worth visiting. Other natural wonders include the views of Ronda, Somiedo National Park and Las Medulas.

Wondering what to do in Spain for the adventure seeker? Snow or shine Spain offers world class skiing in the Sierra Nevada mountains, hiking in the Pyrenees, surfing in San Sebastian and mountain climbing and abseiling in the Parque Natural Sierra de Guara and the Parque Nacional de Ordesa. The beaches of the warm Mediterranean beaches of the Costa Del Sol are ideal for water sports.

From bull-running in Pamplona to the processions of Semana Santa, Spain still celebrates a number of traditional festivals throughout the year. A harlequin of colors and celebration, joining in the festivities is something every traveler should try to do.

With so much to choose from you will never be stuck for what to do next in Spain.

Style-conscious men can find shoes, handbags, and accessories from labels like Jil Sander, Balenciaga, and Comme des Garçons at this guy-centric shop.

Catalonia's big art players - the Museu Nacional d'Art de Catalunya, the Fundació Joan Miró, CaixaForum, and the Mies van der Rohe Pavilion - are concentrated on Montjuïc, a small mountain overlooking the port.

Cycling Classics arranges bicycle tours for groups, guided bicycle vacations, and self-guided tours for individuals through France. (As a joint U.S.

What to Expect: Located partly on a peninsula near the old-but-still-working harbor in the traditional fisherman’s quarter of town, this three-quarter-mile-long family- and tourist-friendly beach was once a funky, working-class area with to-die-for seafood restaurants.

At the bustling main market, the stands heave with ripe fruits, cheeses, nuts, herbs, snails, and the garnet-red tuna, which is so prized by the Japanese that they wait offshore to snap up whatever they can from area fishermen.

Ask a sophisticated Barcelona native where he'll be this weekend, and the answer is often the Centre de Cultura Contemporània de Barcelona (CCCB).

You can multitask your leisure time in this restaurant/café/lounge/disco, which is housed in a palatial former family home, with Grandmother's hand-blocked wallpaper still hanging in the dining room. Swank furnishings in the rest of the club are a hip nod to the future.

Seize the day (or make that the night), with a typically late supper of Asian-accented Mediterranean fare followed by a spin on the busy dance floor at this cavernous disco.

Opened in 1897 and still featuring its original wooden counter and zinc roof, Calzados Lobo sells simple, inexpensive espadrilles, high-heeled shoes originally worn in the Pyrenees, in a mass of colors.

An eclectic crowd, including pilgrims bound for Compostela, visits this L-shaped bar for irresistible matrimonio sandwiches: roasted peppers, salted anchovy, and anchovy in vinegar on a cottony soft bun ($2.20).

A sprawling duty-free emporium, Les Boutiques stocks watches and jewelry from Cartier and Bulgari; Ferragamo purses and leather goods; and signature tartan-print totes, scarves, and umbrellas from Burberry.

Additional Locations in the Madrid Barajas International Airport:

Pick up the sweet-savory pan-con-tomate bonbons from Willy Wonka–like pâtissier Carles Mampel.