Spain

Things to do in Spain

Whether stopping for a quick city break or spending the summer’s months exploring the whole country, there are so many things to do in Spain.

The capital city Madrid offers tourists world class shopping, a plethora of art galleries and museums and a championship football team for soccer, but for many travellers Barcelona stands out as the must-see cultural epicenter. From Gaudí's fantastical buildings to the Museu Picasso De Barcelona there is so much to see and to do for culture junkies. The Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao is also worth a visit.

There are many more things to do in Spain outside the big cities. With 44 historic wonders, Spain has the 3rd most UNESCO World Heritage sites in the world. The Roman aqueduct at Segovia and Alhambra in Granada are just two that are worth visiting. Other natural wonders include the views of Ronda, Somiedo National Park and Las Medulas.

Wondering what to do in Spain for the adventure seeker? Snow or shine Spain offers world class skiing in the Sierra Nevada mountains, hiking in the Pyrenees, surfing in San Sebastian and mountain climbing and abseiling in the Parque Natural Sierra de Guara and the Parque Nacional de Ordesa. The beaches of the warm Mediterranean beaches of the Costa Del Sol are ideal for water sports.

From bull-running in Pamplona to the processions of Semana Santa, Spain still celebrates a number of traditional festivals throughout the year. A harlequin of colors and celebration, joining in the festivities is something every traveler should try to do.

With so much to choose from you will never be stuck for what to do next in Spain.

At Madrid’s best cocktail bar, tuxedoed bartenders wield wooden batons to crack the ice that chills your martini glass, and the devilishly sweet vodka fizz veritably buzzes in your hand.

The windows are filled with candy and shaded under a wide, striped awning at Caramelos Paco, which opened as a grocery shop in 1934. Two years on, owner D. Francisco Moreno Redondo started specializing in chocolates and candies.

A travel agent for nearly 30 years, Rachel Epstein specializes in tours of Spain and Israel, where she guides people through sites like Jerusalem’s Yad Vashem, the world center for Holocaust research (she's been to Israel more than fifty times!).

The hillside neighborhood of Pedralbes, in northwestern Barcelona, is full of 19th- and early-20th-century mansions (built by textile barons and industrialists), but its crowning glory is the serene 14th-century cloister Monestir de Pedralbes.

In her compact shop, German expat Marie Jennings offers bold and breezy Margit Brandt silk dresses and vintage classics like 1980’s Givenchy, sourced from stylists across Europe.

“The ponds here are gorgeous against the citadel.”

Merchants used to keep an eye out for incoming shipments from the colonies at the Torre, one of Cádiz's most famous lookouts. Today, the tower contains a camera obscura, which uses Renaissance technology to project a real-time image of the modern cityscape.

Working in metals such as brushed 18-karat gold and oxidized silver, jeweler Enric Majoral creates chic, versatile pieces that can be dressed both up and down.

After more than a decade of planning and construction, and an outlay of $210 million, Spain's most revered cultural icon unveiled its 237,000-square-foot expansion in 2007, designed by Rafael Moneo.

Based in Madrid, Cellar Tours takes private groups on luxury food and wine tasting trips throughout Europe, including Spain, Portugal, Italy, France, and Ireland.

Having started in the Middle Ages, El Rastro is a rambling 3,500-vendor market in the old streets of Madrid. The market begins at 9 a.m. on Sundays and holidays, but gets busiest by 11 a.m.