Restaurants in Singapore

Housed inside the chic Hotel 1929, Ember serves an innovative menu of Asian-influenced European cuisine crafted by chef Sebastian Ng.

Located in the hawker center of the bustling Tiong Bahru market, the Roasted Pig Specialist is easily recognizable by its bright yellow and green awning. The small stand roasts its own pigs and serves them whole (priced and sold by size) or in slices over beds of rice.

Long a Singapore mainstay for Nonya (Chinese and Malay) cuisine, Kim Choo’s built its reputation on fragrant rice dumplings—which it stuffs and steams in 12 varieties, from chili prawns to minced pork and winter melon.

The highest restaurant in Singapore, Si Chuan Dou Hua serves traditional Sichuan and Cantonese cuisine on the 60th floor of the UOB Plaza One skyscraper.

Located in Chinatown’s New Majestic Hotel, this namesake restaurant is owned by acclaimed chef Yong Bing Ngen, previously of Jade and Jiang-Nan Chun.

Founder Wong Yew Hwa slowly simmers his spicy noodle soups over a traditional charcoal fire.

A smart, busy place on the Esplanade that started life as a hawker stall, No Signboard Seafood Restaurant offers its giant Sri Lankan crab under a lava of addictive, ruddy-hued sweet-piquant hot sauce amped with garlic, pungent shrimp paste, and a host of secret ingredients.

Located in the science and research—driven Biopolis neighborhood, Infuzi is a modern European eatery run by chef Freddie Lee. The high-ceilinged dining room is furnished with decorative glass walls, and small, intimate tables are illuminated by candlelight.

A plate of slippery rice noodles loaded with Chinese sausage, eggs, and fish-cake nuggets should do the trick.

This laid-back open-air hangout in Changi’s rooftop cactus garden has spectacular views of the runway, live jazz on weeknights, and a well-stocked cigar lounge.

Owned by husband and wife Emmanuel Stroobant and Edina Hong, Saint Pierre is widely considered one of Singapore’s finest restaurants thanks to Stroobant’s innovative take on French and Japanese cuisine.

Broth, which is an acronym for Bar Restaurant on the Hill, stands out among the other Duxton Hill eateries thanks to its unique menu of Australian cuisine.

"Sin Huat is a wonderland of fresh seafood—notably the Crab Bee Hoon. The service, however, could be described as borderline hostile, and the decor? Nonexistent. Grab your own Tiger beer from the case, and hopefully, eventually, someone will bring mugs and ice. Yes.