Singapore

Restaurants in Singapore

The residents of Singapore love to eat out. By one estimate there are 20,000 restaurants feeding its population of 5 million. Some of the best restaurants in Singapore are white glove, gourmet destinations while more humble options include countless street food stalls—with its rigorously enforced health codes, you can dine at them without fear. Singapore restaurants run the gamut of cuisines—at the crossroads of Southeast Asia, you'll find Thai, Malay, Indonesian and other options, while the country's large Indian population has the subcontinent's cuisine covered. Unique to Singapore, and a few cities in Malaysia, is Peranakan cuisine, a hybrid of Chinese and Malaysian cuisines.
To experience the full range of the city's culinary scene, check out Singapore restaurants that are a once-per-trip splurge, like Saint Pierre, as well as the food stalls. In Saint Pierre's formal central business district dining room, the kitchen serves dishes that are a unique combination of Japanese and French. The selection of foie gras is one of its specialties. When it's time to check out some of the more wallet-friendly options, Hainanese chicken is an unofficial national dish—chicken poached in stock and served with a chili and garlic sauce.  

The Dutch colonizers of Indonesia put their own spin on the local nasi padang feast, an array of small dishes served with a helping of rice. Today, the toned-down rijsttafel is more popular abroad than in Indonesia itself.

Changi’s newest hotel houses a stylish eatery spotlighting an international team of chefs in two show kitchens.

Although Buko Nero loosely translates to “hole in the wall,” the small restaurant often books out a month in advance thanks to its inventive Asian-Italian fusion cuisine.

One of the oldest restaurants in the Chinatown district, this classic Cantonese eatery was first established in 1928. The two-story dining room is simple but inviting, with wooden floors and large windows that overlook the neighborhood’s busy streets and markets.

Contemporary Chinese fusion in an artsy setting (with great people-watching).

This quick-stop coffee shop—an outpost of a 65-year-old chain—specializes in “toast sets,” or mini-sandwiches.

Housed in a colonial-style shophouse, Oso Ristorante serves authentic Italian cuisine crafted by renowned chef Diego Chiarini.

Housed inside the chic Hotel 1929, Ember serves an innovative menu of Asian-influenced European cuisine crafted by chef Sebastian Ng.

Located in the hawker center of the bustling Tiong Bahru market, the Roasted Pig Specialist is easily recognizable by its bright yellow and green awning. The small stand roasts its own pigs and serves them whole (priced and sold by size) or in slices over beds of rice.

Long a Singapore mainstay for Nonya (Chinese and Malay) cuisine, Kim Choo’s built its reputation on fragrant rice dumplings—which it stuffs and steams in 12 varieties, from chili prawns to minced pork and winter melon.

The highest restaurant in Singapore, Si Chuan Dou Hua serves traditional Sichuan and Cantonese cuisine on the 60th floor of the UOB Plaza One skyscraper.

Located in Chinatown’s New Majestic Hotel, this namesake restaurant is owned by acclaimed chef Yong Bing Ngen, previously of Jade and Jiang-Nan Chun.

Founder Wong Yew Hwa slowly simmers his spicy noodle soups over a traditional charcoal fire.

A smart, busy place on the Esplanade that started life as a hawker stall, No Signboard Seafood Restaurant offers its giant Sri Lankan crab under a lava of addictive, ruddy-hued sweet-piquant hot sauce amped with garlic, pungent shrimp paste, and a host of secret ingredients.

Located in the science and research—driven Biopolis neighborhood, Infuzi is a modern European eatery run by chef Freddie Lee. The high-ceilinged dining room is furnished with decorative glass walls, and small, intimate tables are illuminated by candlelight.