Singapore

Restaurants in Singapore

The eponymous chef's kaiseki restaurant serves not-to-be-missed dishes that mimic the seasons.

Showcasing its own brand of ready-made pastas and sauces amid vibrant orchid-accented décor, this full-service fast-food joint’s menu runs the gamut of Singaporean cuisine, including an exceptional soup selection.

This casual, Italian chain has several locations throughout Singapore and has earned a loyal following with its selection of specialty, wood-fired pizzas.

The Dutch colonizers of Indonesia put their own spin on the local nasi padang feast, an array of small dishes served with a helping of rice. Today, the toned-down rijsttafel is more popular abroad than in Indonesia itself.

Changi’s newest hotel houses a stylish eatery spotlighting an international team of chefs in two show kitchens.

Although Buko Nero loosely translates to “hole in the wall,” the small restaurant often books out a month in advance thanks to its inventive Asian-Italian fusion cuisine.

One of the oldest restaurants in the Chinatown district, this classic Cantonese eatery was first established in 1928. The two-story dining room is simple but inviting, with wooden floors and large windows that overlook the neighborhood’s busy streets and markets.

Contemporary Chinese fusion in an artsy setting (with great people-watching).

This quick-stop coffee shop—an outpost of a 65-year-old chain—specializes in “toast sets,” or mini-sandwiches.

Housed in a colonial-style shophouse, Oso Ristorante serves authentic Italian cuisine crafted by renowned chef Diego Chiarini.

Housed inside the chic Hotel 1929, Ember serves an innovative menu of Asian-influenced European cuisine crafted by chef Sebastian Ng.

Located in the hawker center of the bustling Tiong Bahru market, the Roasted Pig Specialist is easily recognizable by its bright yellow and green awning. The small stand roasts its own pigs and serves them whole (priced and sold by size) or in slices over beds of rice.

Long a Singapore mainstay for Nonya (Chinese and Malay) cuisine, Kim Choo’s built its reputation on fragrant rice dumplings—which it stuffs and steams in 12 varieties, from chili prawns to minced pork and winter melon.

The highest restaurant in Singapore, Si Chuan Dou Hua serves traditional Sichuan and Cantonese cuisine on the 60th floor of the UOB Plaza One skyscraper.