Singapore

Restaurants in Singapore

A plate of slippery rice noodles loaded with Chinese sausage, eggs, and fish-cake nuggets should do the trick.

This laid-back open-air hangout in Changi’s rooftop cactus garden has spectacular views of the runway, live jazz on weeknights, and a well-stocked cigar lounge.

Owned by husband and wife Emmanuel Stroobant and Edina Hong, Saint Pierre is widely considered one of Singapore’s finest restaurants thanks to Stroobant’s innovative take on French and Japanese cuisine.

Broth, which is an acronym for Bar Restaurant on the Hill, stands out among the other Duxton Hill eateries thanks to its unique menu of Australian cuisine.

"Sin Huat is a wonderland of fresh seafood—notably the Crab Bee Hoon. The service, however, could be described as borderline hostile, and the decor? Nonexistent. Grab your own Tiger beer from the case, and hopefully, eventually, someone will bring mugs and ice. Yes.

Originally founded in Taiwan, Din Tai Fung is a casual Chinese restaurant serving traditional dim sum, rice, and noodle dishes. The popularity of the restaurant’s steamed dumplings launched a global enterprise with locations in the United States, Japan, China, and Korea.

The eponymous chef's kaiseki restaurant serves not-to-be-missed dishes that mimic the seasons.

Showcasing its own brand of ready-made pastas and sauces amid vibrant orchid-accented décor, this full-service fast-food joint’s menu runs the gamut of Singaporean cuisine, including an exceptional soup selection.

This casual, Italian chain has several locations throughout Singapore and has earned a loyal following with its selection of specialty, wood-fired pizzas.

The Dutch colonizers of Indonesia put their own spin on the local nasi padang feast, an array of small dishes served with a helping of rice. Today, the toned-down rijsttafel is more popular abroad than in Indonesia itself.

Changi’s newest hotel houses a stylish eatery spotlighting an international team of chefs in two show kitchens.

Although Buko Nero loosely translates to “hole in the wall,” the small restaurant often books out a month in advance thanks to its inventive Asian-Italian fusion cuisine.

One of the oldest restaurants in the Chinatown district, this classic Cantonese eatery was first established in 1928. The two-story dining room is simple but inviting, with wooden floors and large windows that overlook the neighborhood’s busy streets and markets.