Sierra Nevadas + Yosemite

Sierra Nevadas + Yosemite Travel Guide

Whether you’re hiking or summiting, stop at the U.S. Forest Service’s ranger station for a free wilderness permit and—if you’re doing for it—a $20 summit pass.

This easy one-mile loop in Sequoia National Park begins at the Giant Forest Museum and takes about one hour to walk. It’s also handicap-accessible.

The boutique stocks dozens of cult denim brands. Head there during Friday happy hour for discount prices and wine tastings—guaranteed to make any jeans fit better.

First founded by gold miners in 1850, Columbia is now the Columbia State Historic Park, with everything from hotels to restaurants to schools (it’s still a real town). Sure, it’s touristy, but panning for gold at the Hidden Treasure mine is a thrill.

Yosemite National Park is justifiably famous for its awe-inspiring, spiritually uplifting grandeur. Plan your trip with Yosemite Park Service.

Be sure to stop by the ecology exhibits at this intimate museum dedicated to amazing trees.

The mountain is famous for its experts-only runs, and has long cornered the market on celebrity-driven fabulosity.

At least five hikers have fallen to their deaths on the final pitch of Yosemite’s popular Half Dome formation. In the running as America’s most deadly trail, the total hike is about eight miles.

Sailing Ventures, based in Carson City, offers everything from a two-hour dip-your-toes-in to five-day certification courses aboard 22- to 32-foot sailboats. Don’t fall in—Tahoe is the second-deepest lake in the country.

Arrange half-day horseback rides through Yosemite to see the park’s mountains and meadows.

This apothecary-like space with tin ceilings and gleaming antique cabinets is piled with lacy lingerie, Italian linen sheets, and beauty products from around the world.

The world’s largest living tree is estimated to be 2,100 years old.

Ten miles north of Mono Lake, this abandoned 1880s mining town was once so wild that, for 8,500 residents, it had 60 saloons.