Shanghai

Shanghai Travel Guide

Shanghai is a popular spot for night owls who never miss out a chance to enjoy the nightlife. Travelers wondering what to do in Shanghai should visit Huangpu River Cruise, with each tour ranging from 30 minutes to 6 hours. This is a great way to see the city’s striking skyline, one of the best things to do in Shanghai. Oriental Pearl TV Tower, Huangpu Park, the Bund, and Jin Mao Tower are other attractions.

Another thing to do in Shanghai is to visit a traditional Chinese tea house. The city has many, the best of which may be Tang Yun tea house, where you can serve yourself many varieties of tea, along with traditional Chinese delicacies.

If you’re wondering what to do in Shanghai with kids, check out one of the city’s many theme parks, like Shanghai Happy Valley or Jinjiang Amusement Park. Also worth visiting are Madame Tussauds Shanghai, the Shanghai Propaganda Poster and Art Centre, and Shanghai City Beach, a beautiful city beach is on the north bank of Hangzhou Bay. It has golden sands, blue waters, and outdoor activities like beach volleyball, boating, bungee jumping, and 4-wheeling.

Stroll the riverfront promenade known as the Bund, with its Art Deco, Neoclassical, and Beaux-Arts façades, bars and shops, and views of the space-age towers of Pudong.

Lyndon Neri and Rossana Hu’s modern design and furniture boutique.

Have a nightcap at decadent Bar Rouge, high above the Bund in Shanghai.

At this bookshop-café on one of the elegantly shaded streets in the French Concession, coffee addicts linger late into the night amid the Ming-dynasty-style décor.

This unassuming shop with a white front and simple black signage stands out on a road of fashion shops. Owner Liu Xiao Lan, a member of the Miao ethnic group, sells handmade items with an emphasis on Miao-crafted goods. The variety can include handcrafted tapestries, ornaments, and shoes.

The exhibition hall displays samples of batik prints dating back to the 1890's.

Xintiandi was the birthplace of the Chinese Communist Party; now this restored two-block district is defined by upscale shops and restaurants.

The bar on the 58th floor of the Ritz-Carlton Shanghai, Pudong, with great views and a clubby vibe.

Original Debut: Unveiled in 1932 by Hungarian architect L. E. Hudec (responsible for more than 60 Shanghai landmarks), Grand Cinema had Art Deco flourishes, a glistening three-tiered roof shaped like a water lily, and—unfortunately for the warm-blooded—no inner cooling system.

The shop's memorabilia merchandise includes retro vinyl Chairman Mao and Lin Biao buttons.

The shop represents some of China's best-known contemporary artists and was the first gallery in the country to participate in major fairs such as Art Basel.

The space is located in an enclave of art studios and antique shops in a row of converted warehouses.