Shanghai

Restaurants in Shanghai

Shanghai restaurants offer fusion food from Chinese and Jiangnan culture. The local cuisine tends to be sweet and oily, noted for its freshness, bright colors, and original flavors. “Shanghai” means “above the sea,” and fitting, the local population loves to eat seafood, especially freshwater fishes, steamed shell fishes, stir fried shellfish and crabs. You can find the best local food at Bellagio Restaurant.

When it comes to meat, the Shanghainese demonstrate a strong preference for pork, served in a variety of ways at the best restaurants in Shanghai. The Crystal Jade restaurant serves minced pork in buns, stripped pork and slices are used in soups and stir-fries. Locals tend to enjoy food that is sweet and sour rather than spicy. Restaurants in Shanghai also serve chicken, duck, and regional specialties like deep-fried stinky tofu. Shanghai restaurants also serve plenty of organic vegetables.

Travel + Leisure lists Allure and Coconut Paradise as two of the best restaurants in Shanghai. Coconut Paradise serves an excellent Thai dinner which includes spring rolls, pad Thai varieties, ricepaper crab, and many more delicacies, and Allure is a popular French restaurant in Shanghai.

In 1918, Wing On was one of four Nanjing Road department stores that helped define Shanghai as the Paris of the Far East. Now it houses Xian Qiang Fang, which is a perfect balance of old and new, with its green-marble vestibule and Art Deco dining room.

When money is no issue, this two-level restaurant perched atop the historic Bund building offers a VIP experience. Having hosted Tom Cruise and Halle Berry, the Cupola readily claims elite status.

A refreshing alternative to the city’s ubiquitous Chinese restaurants, this small café serves traditional Cuban fare in the Changning district. The interior is simple and inviting, with walls covered in mostly Spanish graffiti.

Shouning Road is lined with street-side grills, men kneeling in alleys shucking oysters and throwing shells on alleyway middens, food carts selling roast duck, dessert stalls and grill stands circled with stools and parked motorcycles, and a constant, moving, happy throng of late-night snackers.

Part of the Elite Concepts group, this restaurant has sister locations in Hong Kong and Kowloon. Housed in a brick mansion in the Xintiandi district, the interior has a nostalgic vibe with mid-century decorations and traditional artwork.

Haya Ronen plays dual roles of chef and owner at this spot in the Jing ‘an district that specializes in Israeli-influenced fare. The purple and yellow sign above the door welcomes diners, and an open, vividly-colored space sets a casual tone.

Fiery Sichuan food on a packed French Concession street.

The historic Union Building became “Three on the Bund” in 2004, and the fifth floor houses the 120-seat Whampoa Club. Located inside one of the Financial Street district's last siheyuan (courtyards), the restaurant has an Art Deco interior with gold and red tones and a lotus pond.

This venue is closed.

This venue is closed.

The menu features Yellow River bamboo with ham; translucent gooey balls of summer yam with pork and scallions; and lu yu, a river fish with a sour, spicy broth.

Although located on the second floor of the Xintiandi shopping mall, this restaurant is far from the typical food court options found in malls. Bright red poles line the entrance, and noodle crafters can be seen shaping noodles from dough in the La Mian style.