Shanghai

Restaurants in Shanghai

The historic Union Building became “Three on the Bund” in 2004, and the fifth floor houses the 120-seat Whampoa Club. Located inside one of the Financial Street district's last siheyuan (courtyards), the restaurant has an Art Deco interior with gold and red tones and a lotus pond.

This venue is closed.

A three-floored building of the Ming Dynasty style is home to this restaurant, famously said to have hosted Bill Clinton and Fidel Castro.

Despite the exclusive-sounding moniker, this French Concession restaurant is open to common and famous; Ralph Fiennes, Yao Ming, and Jackie Chan have all graced the guest list. The villa has played many parts in its history, as home, office, and dining spot.

The menu features Yellow River bamboo with ham; translucent gooey balls of summer yam with pork and scallions; and lu yu, a river fish with a sour, spicy broth.

This venue is closed.

The Uighur people bring their northwest Chinese flavors to this glass-fronted restaurant. Chinese Western Muslim music sets the rowdy atmosphere inside; the singing and dancing waiters occasionally also dance with diners.

"This Bellagio is not a Las Vegas hotel, but a faux-swanky Taiwanese brasserie. There are several locations in Shanghai, and they're all open at all hours.

While there are many choices for dim sum in Shanghai, Soahc makes its mark with Yangzhou-influenced cuisine.

Although located on the second floor of the Xintiandi shopping mall, this restaurant is far from the typical food court options found in malls. Bright red poles line the entrance, and noodle crafters can be seen shaping noodles from dough in the La Mian style.

This renovated townhouse in the French Concession district provides an elegant, dimly lit backdrop for a Thai dinner. The interior is marked by teak doors, Asian hardwood floors, and a collection of Buddhist artifacts.

Chef Paul Pairet's lively, modern French restaurant offers all-day people-watching. The staff is knowledgeable and the food delicious; try the steak and foie gras.

This restaurant on the eleventh floor of Le Royal Méridien hotel offers a taste of France in the hub of Shanghai. This 50-seat location puts food before views; Chef Michael Wendling prepares dishes from the southern region of France.

Sometimes the best way to find a restaurant is look for the longest lines, and that’s the case for this street-side restaurant that specializes in shengjian baozi, steamed pork buns. A couple dollars will buy four of these thin-skinned snacks, which are partly fried and partly steamed.