Restaurants in Shanghai

Haya Ronen plays dual roles of chef and owner at this spot in the Jing ‘an district that specializes in Israeli-influenced fare. The purple and yellow sign above the door welcomes diners, and an open, vividly-colored space sets a casual tone.

Fiery Sichuan food on a packed French Concession street.

Cuisine from the southern Hunan region is known for its smoke, spice, and rich color. This Jing’an neighborhood restaurant’s reputation precedes it, so it’s often crowded.

Japanese architect Sakea Miura designed this bunker-like restaurant, which was once a movie theater for retired government officials. Guests enter down a concrete walkway through a bamboo garden and by Shintori’s sole sign, a large white stone.

The dark, Deco-y Shanghainese restaurant serves roast duck wrapped in mantou buns, kao fu, a warm, brown, bready, tofu-like rice-gluten substance that is very comforting; and steamed fish head.

This venue is closed.

The historic Union Building became “Three on the Bund” in 2004, and the fifth floor houses the 120-seat Whampoa Club. Located inside one of the Financial Street district's last siheyuan (courtyards), the restaurant has an Art Deco interior with gold and red tones and a lotus pond.

A three-floored building of the Ming Dynasty style is home to this restaurant, famously said to have hosted Bill Clinton and Fidel Castro.

Despite the exclusive-sounding moniker, this French Concession restaurant is open to common and famous; Ralph Fiennes, Yao Ming, and Jackie Chan have all graced the guest list. The villa has played many parts in its history, as home, office, and dining spot.

This venue is closed.

The menu features Yellow River bamboo with ham; translucent gooey balls of summer yam with pork and scallions; and lu yu, a river fish with a sour, spicy broth.