Shanghai

Restaurants in Shanghai

Shanghai restaurants offer fusion food from Chinese and Jiangnan culture. The local cuisine tends to be sweet and oily, noted for its freshness, bright colors, and original flavors. “Shanghai” means “above the sea,” and fitting, the local population loves to eat seafood, especially freshwater fishes, steamed shell fishes, stir fried shellfish and crabs. You can find the best local food at Bellagio Restaurant.

When it comes to meat, the Shanghainese demonstrate a strong preference for pork, served in a variety of ways at the best restaurants in Shanghai. The Crystal Jade restaurant serves minced pork in buns, stripped pork and slices are used in soups and stir-fries. Locals tend to enjoy food that is sweet and sour rather than spicy. Restaurants in Shanghai also serve chicken, duck, and regional specialties like deep-fried stinky tofu. Shanghai restaurants also serve plenty of organic vegetables.

Travel + Leisure lists Allure and Coconut Paradise as two of the best restaurants in Shanghai. Coconut Paradise serves an excellent Thai dinner which includes spring rolls, pad Thai varieties, ricepaper crab, and many more delicacies, and Allure is a popular French restaurant in Shanghai.

On Sunday mornings, young expat families brunch on the terrace of M on the Bund, Shanghai’s first fine-dining Western-style restaurant, framed against the pink TV tower and other kitschy buildings of Pudong across the Huangpu River.

Japanese architect Sakea Miura designed this bunker-like restaurant, which was once a movie theater for retired government officials. Guests enter down a concrete walkway through a bamboo garden and by Shintori’s sole sign, a large white stone.

A three-floored building of the Ming Dynasty style is home to this restaurant, famously said to have hosted Bill Clinton and Fidel Castro.

The Uighur people bring their northwest Chinese flavors to this glass-fronted restaurant. Chinese Western Muslim music sets the rowdy atmosphere inside; the singing and dancing waiters occasionally also dance with diners.

"This Bellagio is not a Las Vegas hotel, but a faux-swanky Taiwanese brasserie. There are several locations in Shanghai, and they're all open at all hours.

This renovated townhouse in the French Concession district provides an elegant, dimly lit backdrop for a Thai dinner. The interior is marked by teak doors, Asian hardwood floors, and a collection of Buddhist artifacts.

French chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten incorporates his affinity for Eastern tastes into the flavors and textures of his cuisine. The first restaurant bearing his name outside America opened in 2004 on the fourth floor of Three on the Bund.

Xiao long bao (Shanghainese soup dumplings) are the speciality. ($1)

Ubiquitous chain with English menus and solid xiao long bao. Various locations.

This Julu Road eatery is a favorite with expats and locals looking for a unique dining option. Nepali Kitchen serves food of the Himalayas inside its dining room, which has low tables, cushion seats, prayer flags, and bright-colored walls.

One of multiple Jade Garden locations in Shanghai, this restaurant near the Luwan district serves Shanghainese dishes and specialties, such as drunken chicken and kao fu. Tender meats like eel and tea-smoked duck collaborate with rich sauces to deliver a diverse, multi-course meal.

The South Beauty group manages over 40 restaurants across China, and the 881 outpost makes its home in two buildings: a 1930’s restored stone villa and a glass and wood building.

Classic Shanghainese food in a French Concession villa.