Shanghai

Restaurants in Shanghai

Shanghai restaurants offer fusion food from Chinese and Jiangnan culture. The local cuisine tends to be sweet and oily, noted for its freshness, bright colors, and original flavors. “Shanghai” means “above the sea,” and fitting, the local population loves to eat seafood, especially freshwater fishes, steamed shell fishes, stir fried shellfish and crabs. You can find the best local food at Bellagio Restaurant.

When it comes to meat, the Shanghainese demonstrate a strong preference for pork, served in a variety of ways at the best restaurants in Shanghai. The Crystal Jade restaurant serves minced pork in buns, stripped pork and slices are used in soups and stir-fries. Locals tend to enjoy food that is sweet and sour rather than spicy. Restaurants in Shanghai also serve chicken, duck, and regional specialties like deep-fried stinky tofu. Shanghai restaurants also serve plenty of organic vegetables.

Travel + Leisure lists Allure and Coconut Paradise as two of the best restaurants in Shanghai. Coconut Paradise serves an excellent Thai dinner which includes spring rolls, pad Thai varieties, ricepaper crab, and many more delicacies, and Allure is a popular French restaurant in Shanghai.

Although located on the second floor of the Xintiandi shopping mall, this restaurant is far from the typical food court options found in malls. Bright red poles line the entrance, and noodle crafters can be seen shaping noodles from dough in the La Mian style.

This restaurant on the eleventh floor of Le Royal Méridien hotel offers a taste of France in the hub of Shanghai. This 50-seat location puts food before views; Chef Michael Wendling prepares dishes from the southern region of France.

Sometimes the best way to find a restaurant is look for the longest lines, and that’s the case for this street-side restaurant that specializes in shengjian baozi, steamed pork buns. A couple dollars will buy four of these thin-skinned snacks, which are partly fried and partly steamed.

Table No. 1 is a pared-back, industrial-chic restaurant, stripped to its unadorned material essence.

Chef de cuisine Franckelie Laloum, formerly of Michelin three-starred Maison Pic and Maison Troisgros, brings his top-shelf experience to this French restaurant on the 36th floor of the Pudong Shangri-La hotel.

Perched in the middle of a man-made lake, the path to this house twists and turns (legend says spirits don’t do curves.) Also known as “Huxin Ting,” this two-story building with traditional Chinese architecture was built in the Qing Dynasty and turned teahouse in 1855.

China is a popular place for tea so it’s no surprise that teahouses abound across the country. After a flight of stairs to the second floor, this Old Shanghai establishment opens up and surrounds tea-lovers with an array of antiques, such as maps and posters from the 1930’s and 1940’s.

This venue is closed.

Nine lights at the end of a cement staircase make up the unmarked entrance to this trendy restaurant and bar. Once the mystery of entrance is solved, a modern gray interior is the setting for contemporary Chinese cuisine.

On Sunday mornings, young expat families brunch on the terrace of M on the Bund, Shanghai’s first fine-dining Western-style restaurant, framed against the pink TV tower and other kitschy buildings of Pudong across the Huangpu River.

Japanese architect Sakea Miura designed this bunker-like restaurant, which was once a movie theater for retired government officials. Guests enter down a concrete walkway through a bamboo garden and by Shintori’s sole sign, a large white stone.

A three-floored building of the Ming Dynasty style is home to this restaurant, famously said to have hosted Bill Clinton and Fidel Castro.

The Uighur people bring their northwest Chinese flavors to this glass-fronted restaurant. Chinese Western Muslim music sets the rowdy atmosphere inside; the singing and dancing waiters occasionally also dance with diners.