Hotels in Shanghai

JIA consists of fifty-two rooms, plus two 1,000-plus-square-foot penthouse suites, both specially designed for high-profile guests (with bodyguards in tow). Space has not been sacrificed to style—even standard rooms clock in at almost 500 square feet.

A master of luxe hospitality, Peninsula Hotels chairman Michael Kadoorie spent his childhood in Shanghai. So the March 2010 premiere of his ninth property, the Peninsula Shanghai, was a homecoming of sorts.

It’s not easy to stand apart in Shanghai’s booming hotel scene, which is why Waldorf Astoria pulled out all the stops for its China debut.

A 26-story property in the heart of China’s busiest metropolis doesn’t normally bring to mind tranquillity, but PuLi’s black tile-floored lobby offers instant serenity—as do the 229 rooms and suites in gray Shanghainese brick and tables topped with slate-colored inkstone.

328 rooms (which are some of the largest in the city) with Chinese art and ceramics; hotel butlers are trained as both city guides and translators.

Perched between the Bund and People’s Square, this 570-room hotel attracts a mixed clientele of corporate high rollers, Asian celebs, and global leisure seekers.

It’s almost impossible to actually walk anywhere in the frenetic Pudong neighborhood—but Ritz-Carlton’s second Shanghai property offers plenty of reasons to stay put. Topping off Cesar Pelli’s 58-story IFC Shanghai building, the 285-room hotel places you in a cloud-level fantasy.

Formerly Sofitel Shanghai Jin Jiang Oriental

Business amenities and 445 simple rooms, next to the New International Expo Centre. 

Formerly the Regent Shanghai, the Longemont hotel rises 53 stories above the Changning district, just 10 minutes from the Bund. Inside, huge white columns and a spiral staircase create a sense of drama in the high-ceilinged lobby.

When it opened, 1,358 foot-tall the Park Hyatt Shanghai stole the title of world's tallest hotel (from its sister property across the street, the Grand Hyatt Shanghai).

Shanghai hotels tend toward the vertical and voluptuous, but one look at this austere lobby—exposed brick walls; steel beams; stone floors—and it’s clear the Waterhouse has broken the mold.

Stories abound about the origin of this castle-like building. Some say it was inspired by shipping mogul Eric Moller’s daughters dream, while others say the Scandinavian style owes to Moller’s Swedish roots.

One of Shanghai’s first ultrahigh hotels (it opened in 2003), the JW is still one of the city’s best-located properties.

In the iconic Shanghai neighborhood known as the Bund, Les Suites Orient is a minimalist escape—a hotel that’s both smaller in scale (just 125 rooms and 43 suites) and infinitely more understated than its flashy neighbors. The result: a seemingly insulated respite from the Bund’s vibrant hustle.

There's no better place to embrace Shanghai's glamorous past and high-tech future than from these twin towers on the northern section of the Bund.