Hotels in Shanghai

A quiet B&B in a lane house in the French Concession.

One of the world’s tallest hotels, this property (which occupies floors 53–87) also has a rooftop bar and an Art Deco–meets–Chinese aesthetic. 

Room to Book: Ask for a river-facing room for views of the Huangpu.

Doubles from $468.

JIA consists of fifty-two rooms, plus two 1,000-plus-square-foot penthouse suites, both specially designed for high-profile guests (with bodyguards in tow). Space has not been sacrificed to style—even standard rooms clock in at almost 500 square feet.

A master of luxe hospitality, Peninsula Hotels chairman Michael Kadoorie spent his childhood in Shanghai. So the March 2010 premiere of his ninth property, the Peninsula Shanghai, was a homecoming of sorts.

It’s not easy to stand apart in Shanghai’s booming hotel scene, which is why Waldorf Astoria pulled out all the stops for its China debut.

A 26-story property in the heart of China’s busiest metropolis doesn’t normally bring to mind tranquillity, but PuLi’s black tile-floored lobby offers instant serenity—as do the 229 rooms and suites in gray Shanghainese brick and tables topped with slate-colored inkstone.

328 rooms (which are some of the largest in the city) with Chinese art and ceramics; hotel butlers are trained as both city guides and translators.

Perched between the Bund and People’s Square, this 570-room hotel attracts a mixed clientele of corporate high rollers, Asian celebs, and global leisure seekers.

It’s almost impossible to actually walk anywhere in the frenetic Pudong neighborhood—but Ritz-Carlton’s second Shanghai property offers plenty of reasons to stay put. Topping off Cesar Pelli’s 58-story IFC Shanghai building, the 285-room hotel places you in a cloud-level fantasy.

Formerly Sofitel Shanghai Jin Jiang Oriental

Business amenities and 445 simple rooms, next to the New International Expo Centre.