Seattle

Hotels in Seattle

A recent boom means there's an array of standout hotels in Seattle. They're on the expensive side, especially during the high-demand summer months, and rooms with water views are hard to come by, so book well in advance. Here, a shortlist of the best hotels in Seattle:

On Whidbey Island, book a room at the quiet Boatyard Inn for the off-season or far in advance; there are few places to stay on the island, so demand is especially high.
Modern Seattle hotels include the W Hotel (perk: pets are allowed).
If you plan to visit Seattle with friends or family, the quirky Hotel Monaco, located in the center of downtown, is an excellent choice. It's also very Fido-friendly.
Near Pike Place Market, the Four Seasons Hotel is a 21-story tower with spectacular views of Elliot Bay and the Olympic Mountains from practically every angle.
The Woodmark Hotel, Yacht Club, and Spa is an excellent base for business travelers working at the nearby Microsoft Redmond Campus. Top-notch amenities include cashmere throws, soaking tubs, dual-head showers, feather beds, and beds for pets. There's also a kayak available for complimentary use as well as bike rentals.

Contemporary chalet overlooking Snoqualmie Falls in the Cascade Range foothills, with a stellar selection of wilderness offerings, from guided bike rides to kayaking.


There are no TV’s or phones to distract from the idyllic views. Rooms in the converted 1916 tavern and Roosevelt cottages feel the most authentic, thanks to rustic birch furniture and pine-lined walls.

At the new Hotel Murano, each of the 21 guest-floors honors a different artist (from Australian Cockburn to Chihuly), and rooms are filled with one-of-a-kind handblown pieces.

Situated on Lake Union’s southern shore, this 184-room hotel has panoramic views of the waterfront and city skyline. The guest rooms are basic in style, but most overlook the lake and come equipped with free Wi-Fi and 42-inch plasma TV’s. Some also have gas fireplaces and oversize Jacuzzi tubs.

Incredible Elliott Bay and Puget Sound vistas are the draw at this 70-room hotel (which, yes, sits right next to the famous Pike Place Market). The best way to enjoy them: sipping coffee or a cocktail from a teak lounge chair on the fifth-floor deck.

The island’s most unique lodging—two-bedroom Victorian houses that were officers’ quarters. Each house has a full kitchen and subtle pieces of military memorabilia.

Set farther north than the city’s other downtown hotels, this glittering high-rise is separate from the madding crowd (although that’s temporary—a burgeoning gateway district is fast sprouting around it).

Set on Carillon Point overlooking Lake Washington, this 100-room property is a popular wedding and weekend getaway destination. It’s also a frequent home base for business travelers working at nearby Microsoft Redmond Campus.

Like a moneyed earth mother who trolls Whole Foods for overpriced organics, this 189-room hotel strikes an odd balance between simple elegance and conspicuous glitziness.

The ornate B&B in a converted Victorian mansion is a great alternative to downtown's boring business hotels.

It’s easy to get distracted by all the high-tech amenities at the 1000—along with iPod docking stations, Wi-Fi, and personally programmed sensors that control everything from climate to mood lighting in each of the 120 rooms, the hotel also boasts an ingenious (or useless, depending on your POV)

Set on Carillon Point overlooking Lake Washington, this 100-room property is a popular wedding and weekend getaway destination. It’s also a frequent home base for business travelers working at nearby Microsoft Redmond Campus.

Seattle’s first self-proclaimed “art hotel” fills its 121 rooms with works selected by a Seattle Art Museum curator; themed suites are dedicated to local artists and arts institutions (the J. P.

A short walk from the Bainbridge Island ferry, the inn surrounds a small garden, with cozy interiors that feature overstuffed armchairs and Oriental rugs. The rooms have cushy beds and sofas, and DVD players.

You don’t have to love art galleries, vintage-boutique shopping, or indie-rock concerts to enjoy staying at the Max—but it sure helps.