Scotland

Restaurants in Scotland

Scotland isn't known for its cuisine, but that may be changing. A foodie wave is sweeping across the country, revolutionizing the way Scottish people eat. Many Scotland restaurants now offer cuisines from across the globe. Representative of the trend is Boath House, a luxury Scottish hotel/restaurant in Nairn that is frequently cited as one of the best restaurants in Scotland. The chefs at Boath House work tirelessly to allow both hotel residents and restaurant guests to have new and exciting things to eat—the menu often changes daily.

But don't overlook the local food, either. Scottish cuisine is folksy and utilitarian: brothy soups made of neeps and tatties (turnip and potato); rumbledethumps, a traditional dish made of potato, cabbage and onion; and haggis, Scotland's national dish, is served at many Scottish restaurants. Haggis is comprised of offal or leftover meat, stuffed into a sheep or pig's stomach, and then boiled. Many restaurants in Scotland are putting a modern, creative spin on the country's traditional foods, as well. If you’re in the mood to try some famous Scottish bread desserts, visit Sugar & Spice in Auchterarder. They serve everything from sandwiches to their world-famous Scotch pies.

The namesake of renowned local chef Martin Wishart, this Michelin one-starred restaurant is housed in an understated building on the bank of the Water of Leith.

The chalkboard menu changes with the day's catches at this scenic, nautically themed spot on the bustling waterfront. Loch Fyne oysters are a briny treat, and fish cakes are fat and golden. Reservations essential.

Tony Borthwick relocated his Michelin-starred restaurant from the tiny village of Crossmichael to this 38-seat dining room, which opened in December 2006. With inspired dishes (organic pork loin with smoked paprika), he's nipping at the heels of the city's more established chefs.

Order briny Loch Harport oysters on the half shell.

Edinburgh foodies have been coming to this unpretentious second floor space for 17 years. Seasonal ingredients star in seared Scotch salmon with spring chive velouté, and partridge with chicory.

The restaurant serves traditional baked Scottish crotin and rabbit wrapped in Parma ham—all cooked to perfection.

The bar, whose paneling came from a 19th-century passenger ship, serves local Highland beef.

Authentic Scottish dishes like kedgeree (smoked haddock and pearl barley) and haggis cakes with whisky-and-leek sauce are served in this cozy basement dining room, where the owner's grandmother's black iron cooking pot takes pride of place on the back wall.

Dine on simple, seasonal food and fine wines.