Scotland

Restaurants in Scotland

Scotland isn't known for its cuisine, but that may be changing. A foodie wave is sweeping across the country, revolutionizing the way Scottish people eat. Many Scotland restaurants now offer cuisines from across the globe. Representative of the trend is Boath House, a luxury Scottish hotel/restaurant in Nairn that is frequently cited as one of the best restaurants in Scotland. The chefs at Boath House work tirelessly to allow both hotel residents and restaurant guests to have new and exciting things to eat—the menu often changes daily.

But don't overlook the local food, either. Scottish cuisine is folksy and utilitarian: brothy soups made of neeps and tatties (turnip and potato); rumbledethumps, a traditional dish made of potato, cabbage and onion; and haggis, Scotland's national dish, is served at many Scottish restaurants. Haggis is comprised of offal or leftover meat, stuffed into a sheep or pig's stomach, and then boiled. Many restaurants in Scotland are putting a modern, creative spin on the country's traditional foods, as well. If you’re in the mood to try some famous Scottish bread desserts, visit Sugar & Spice in Auchterarder. They serve everything from sandwiches to their world-famous Scotch pies.

The namesake of renowned local chef Martin Wishart, this Michelin one-starred restaurant is housed in an understated building on the bank of the Water of Leith.

Authentic Scottish dishes like kedgeree (smoked haddock and pearl barley) and haggis cakes with whisky-and-leek sauce are served in this cozy basement dining room, where the owner's grandmother's black iron cooking pot takes pride of place on the back wall.

Despite an unassuming exterior, the Mussel Inn restaurant draws crowds with its menu of fresh seafood imported from the western coast of Scotland.

The chalkboard menu changes with the day's catches at this scenic, nautically themed spot on the bustling waterfront. Loch Fyne oysters are a briny treat, and fish cakes are fat and golden. Reservations essential.

Dine on simple, seasonal food and fine wines.

Run by husband and wife Greig and Alice Ramsay in a tiny village outside of Perthshire, Scotland, the menu is both local and seasonal—try a goat-cheese appetizer, an entrée of pancetta-wrapped salmon with baby asparagus, and a trio of chocolate desserts.

Arrive at midday, before the rugby fans take over, nab a red-leather booth and order a pint of Deuchars and the best pub food: steak-and-ale pie, perfectly fried chips, and creamy cullen skink (fish chowder).

Located beside St. Andrew’s Square, this café and wine bar is an offshoot of Valvona & Crolla, the city’s oldest operating deli. Inside, the two-story restaurant is designed in a modern European style with marble floors, dark walnut paneling, and glass counters lined with fresh pastries.