Santa Fe

Santa Fe Travel Guide

The 6,290-foot-high peak is a landmark along the Old Santa Fe Trail.

The Railyard Park is fringed with boutiques and blue-chip galleries.

Hidden amid a slew of kitschy curio shops, the inventory here is the real deal, with a good selection of carved wooden angels and other New Mexican folk art.

Part of the Museum Hill complex about three miles southeast of the Plaza, this is the best of a handful of facilities in town dedicated to preserving and interpreting the Southwest's indigenous pottery, weaving, jewelry, and other art forms.

Reserve well in advance for a guided tour of the Georgia O’Keeffe Home and Studio, still furnished exactly as she left them when she moved to Santa Fe in 1984.

Santa Fe's most esteemed art gallery (it’s been around since 1972) carries artwork that is, in many cases, more valuable than what’s hanging in the city's leading museums.

Revered for its healing holy dirt, this 1816 Spanish mission chapel cradled in a picturesque canyon, is known as the Lourdes of America. Vendors here sell milagros, images of Our Lady of Guadalupe, and other charms.

Victoria Price raises the Santa Fe style bar with her inspired mix of vintage Navajo rugs, Le Corbusier chaises, and stainless-steel jewelry by Native American artist Pat Pruitt.

The definitive compendium of New Mexican art through the ages, the MFA’s collection occupies a rambling 1917 building that also ranks among the state's most elegant examples of Pueblo Revival architecture (Santa Fe's ubiquitous and distinctive

Stroll through the rose and herb gardens of this Territorial-style hacienda often bypassed by gallery-hoppers.