Santa Fe

Santa Fe Travel Guide

Santa Fe is truly a town for everyone with sweeping outdoor expanses that attract thrill-seeking adventurers and lovely art galleries and folk festivals that cater to a more subdued crowd. There are things to do in Santa Fe no matter what kind of traveler you are. Nature buffs should head to the Sangre de Cristo Mountains and admire the stunning trails that tempt hikers and trail runners with their clean alpine air and sparkling views. Hotels can arrange for horseback riding, mountain biking, skiing, white water rafting on the Rio Grande and Chama Rivers.

For more relaxing things to do in Santa Fe, travelers can spend days wandering through the more than 250 art galleries that showcase some of the finest artists in America. Canyon Road, the cluster of adobes that make up the bustling main street in town, have around 80 galleries to look at, but there are many smaller neighborhoods that offer less foot traffic during your art excursions, like the Railyard District. If you’ve exhausted your art gallery list in town and are still wondering what to do in Santa Fe, rent a car and drive 90-minutes up to Taos, NM. Taos has made its name as a quirky town of artists and writers who’ve fled to the gorgeous mountain town for inspiration.

All year there will be moments of enchantment in Santa Fe, it’s just in the nature of New Mexico. Winter travelers can witness the magical farolitos, candles in paper lanterns that line the streets at night. Cars are cleared off the streets and the crisp smell of piñón wood lingers on the air. Check out the list below for the best of what to do in Santa Fe.

The 6,290-foot-high peak is a landmark along the Old Santa Fe Trail.

Part of the Museum Hill complex about three miles southeast of the Plaza, this is the best of a handful of facilities in town dedicated to preserving and interpreting the Southwest's indigenous pottery, weaving, jewelry, and other art forms.

Reserve well in advance for a guided tour of the Georgia O’Keeffe Home and Studio, still furnished exactly as she left them when she moved to Santa Fe in 1984.

Santa Fe's most esteemed art gallery (it’s been around since 1972) carries artwork that is, in many cases, more valuable than what’s hanging in the city's leading museums.

Revered for its healing holy dirt, this 1816 Spanish mission chapel cradled in a picturesque canyon, is known as the Lourdes of America. Vendors here sell milagros, images of Our Lady of Guadalupe, and other charms.

Victoria Price raises the Santa Fe style bar with her inspired mix of vintage Navajo rugs, Le Corbusier chaises, and stainless-steel jewelry by Native American artist Pat Pruitt.

Insider clout: Because of Cunningham’s amazing contacts, she can arrange for clients to see Africa’s “sardine run”—in which hundreds of thousands of migrating fish form massive shoals in the waters off Transkei—from the comfort of a live-on catamaran.

The definitive compendium of New Mexican art through the ages, the MFA’s collection occupies a rambling 1917 building that also ranks among the state's most elegant examples of Pueblo Revival architecture (Santa Fe's ubiquitous and distinctive

Stroll through the rose and herb gardens of this Territorial-style hacienda often bypassed by gallery-hoppers.

Although it’s not quite at the level of Ski Taos and Angel Fire (both of which are about two hours north, and have a greater variety of terrain), Ski Santa Fe is a terrific choice for those who want to stay in the city and still ski.

Just 16 miles outside of Santa Fe, Ski Santa Fe has 67 trails, at all ability levels. With a base height of 10,350 feet, the Santa Fe Basin in one of the highest in the U.S.; the Millennium Triple chairlift carries skiers to a soaring 12,000 feet and an incredible view.

This Anasazi settlement has petroglyphs and wooden ladders that lead to ancient cave dwellings.