San Telmo

San Telmo Travel Guide

As Recoleta mansions were carved into progressively smaller apartments after World War II, the city found itself awash in Art Deco furniture sold by rich Porteños who’d seen their fortunes slide.

Right off Plaza Dorrego is Gil Antigüedades, an unexpected dreamworld of vintage clothing.

Amid San Telmo's antiques galleries, ArtePampa sells pre-Columbian-style dolls, llama-motif mirrors, and lampshades of lacquered, textured paper, all handcrafted in the central province of La Pampa.

Arguably the top fashion designer in Buenos Aires, Ramírez’s store and clothes exude a minimalist elegance that borders on the monastic (although the garments, which Ramírez designs only in black and white, are certainly more body-conscious than a monk’s robes).

Only four people are allowed in at one time where vintage license plates share space with spindly drinking glasses.

This master silversmith creates ornate, silver-lined gourds for sipping mate, Argentina's national drink. We love his re-creations of Eva Peron’s gem-encrusted necklaces.

Historic in architectural form, this museum and event space is housed in a 178-year-old mansion–turned–boarding house that once sat atop the city’s earliest sewer system.

No trip to the city that gave birth to the sultry tango would be complete without taking in a live show. This tiny club, with its black-and-white dance floor, feels like a flashback to another era.

On Sundays it feels like the entire population of Buenos Aires flocks to the San Telmo neighborhood, home to a network of antiques centers that seems to stretch for miles.

End the night at the atmospheric El Federal, a watering hole open since 1864.