San Francisco

Restaurants in San Francisco

Neighborhood swells wash down grilled bavette steak and sinful duck fat–fried potatoes with big-ticket Cabs with prerecession abandon at this masculine chocolate-colored boîte in Presidio Heights.

Sister restaurant to nearby Piperade, this tiny tapas bar is located in Jackson Square just a few blocks from the Embarcadero. Behind a light-green and glass façade, the restaurant contains approximately three dozen seats, including a large communal table set with metallic Eames chairs.

An 880-seat banquet hall installed in the same Chinatown complex as the Asian Cultural Center and Library, Peony prepares Hong Kong-style dishes as well as an elaborate dim sum menu.

Chef-owner Brenda Buenviaje calls on her New Orleans roots to create refined, Creole-influenced fare at her namesake French soul food restaurant. The beignet, a deep-fried pastry similar to a doughnut, is one of her specialties, with varieties including chocolate, apple, or crawfish.

Each day, Julia Yoon tweets the location of her Korean grill on wheels—though this roving restaurant is often somewhere in the SoMa (South of Market) neighborhood. While the food truck’s location changes, the menu of barbecued meats and other Korean dishes remains steady.

Enjoy blue-agave tequilas and Mexican cuisine at Tres on Townsend Street in the SoMa District. Its brick façade features a trio of agave plants above the arched doorway.

Don’t worry if you draw near to The Sentinel and there’s a line, it generally moves quickly and your turn to order will be up before you know it.

This Ferry Building stalwart purveys its triple-S specialtiessoups, salads and sandwichesto a crowd of financial district salarymen (and women) and hungry tourists. The menu skews Italian with California-fresh local ingredients.

The long queue at Humphry Slocombe has a silver lining: waiting leaves more time for mulling over what to order at this Mission district hotspot. Should one order a scoop of the top-selling Secret Breakfast, with its much-vaunted combination of bourbon and toasted cornflakes?

At first glance, Delfina might not look like one of San Francisco’s top restaurants: the zinc tables are linen-less, the waiters are heavily tattooed and pierced, and the room is filled with a happy clamor rather than a reverent hush.

Located on the second floor of the upscale Hotel Nikko, Anzu has the typical hotel restaurant atmosphere: white tablecloths paired with neutral-colored furnishings and low lighting.