San Francisco

Restaurants in San Francisco

Opened in 2004, Circolo is a multi-level restaurant and bar in the heart of downtown San Francisco. Bamboo and metallic curtains separate the main dining room, which seats up to 50 people, from the lounge; and an upstairs mezzanine offers 5 private booths.

Cost alone makes the Nob Hill Café an attractive option in the otherwise wallet stretching neighborhood.

A16’s sister restaurant, SPQR, opened in September 2007 and serves—as you might guess from its name, which refers to the seat of government in ancient Rome—Roman food.

The Nectar Wine Lounge in Marina serves up ambrosia for the soulwith 800 bottles to choose from. Back-lit honeycomb wine racks give way to red and white walls adorned with brightly colored modern art.

The SoMa district is home to Heaven's Dog, whose name symbolizes great success in China. The restaurant specializes in Chinese cooking and pre-Prohibition cocktails, while the upscale cocktail lounge centers around a 30-foot cypress tree-trunk bar and serves a small plates menu.

Housed in a 1903 military barrack, the Presidio Social Club restaurant combines original furnishings, such as stainless-steel medicine cabinets now used as liquor storage, with contemporary design elements.

San Francisco’s Café Gratitude was founded by Matthew and Terces Engelhart after Terces read a book about live foods (foods that have not been exposed to temperatures above 105°F.

Located on Belden Place, a small alleyway lined with European-style cafés, this seafood bistro is renowned for its fresh oysters and mussels.

Coi

Coi's chef (and F&W Best New Chef 1997) Daniel Patterson combines his passions for local ingredients and avant-garde experimentation. With these seemingly opposite directions, Patterson is part mad scientist, part home cook.

In the SoMa District near the James Lick Skyway, Zuppa serves Italian cuisine by chef-owner Joseph Manzare, who has worked in Italy and with Wolfgang Puck.

The high wooden gates at Chez Spencer in SoMa give way to a garden full of herbs, flowers, and olive trees and a heated courtyard filled with fairy lights.

Yoshi's combines an intimate jazz club with an immense Japanese restaurant: Pat Metheny meets bluefin toro roulade.

An obsessive focus on provenance marks Haight-Ashbury's "green Mexican" restaurant. Tortillas aren't just house-made: The organic masa they're crafted from is house-ground, too.

This Burmese/Chinese hole-in-the-wall inspires such cultish devotion that regulars—including both value-conscious college students and ethnic-food connoisseurs—have been known to wait two hours for a table.