San Francisco

Restaurants in San Francisco

Restaurants in San Francisco are second-to-none; the city is renowned for its dining scene, and for good reason – it has more restaurants per capita than any other major city in North America. While the city’s fine dining scene is booming – there are countless San Francisco restaurants that will easily set you back more than $100 a person – it’s also very possible to find delicious meals at affordable price points.

San Francisco is particularly well regarded for its Asian cuisine, and locals share an intense obsession with fresh sushi and dim sum, which can be found throughout the city’s bustling Chinatown. North Beach, San Francisco’s Italian district, also enjoys a lively reputation, and pasta lovers would be amiss to skip a visit to Ristorante Ideale. Considered to be one of the best restaurants in San Francisco for Italian food, this trattoria serves handmade gnocchi and ravioli along with a list of well-priced Italian wines.

A general rule of thumb: San Francisco restaurants are typically corkage friendly, so it’s possible to visit nearby Napa wine country, and bring back a bottle or two to enjoy while dining out in the city.

This Ferry Building stalwart purveys its triple-S specialtiessoups, salads and sandwichesto a crowd of financial district salarymen (and women) and hungry tourists. The menu skews Italian with California-fresh local ingredients.

Each day, Julia Yoon tweets the location of her Korean grill on wheels—though this roving restaurant is often somewhere in the SoMa (South of Market) neighborhood. While the food truck’s location changes, the menu of barbecued meats and other Korean dishes remains steady.

Enjoy blue-agave tequilas and Mexican cuisine at Tres on Townsend Street in the SoMa District. Its brick façade features a trio of agave plants above the arched doorway.

At first glance, Delfina might not look like one of San Francisco’s top restaurants: the zinc tables are linen-less, the waiters are heavily tattooed and pierced, and the room is filled with a happy clamor rather than a reverent hush.

The long queue at Humphry Slocombe has a silver lining: waiting leaves more time for mulling over what to order at this Mission district hotspot. Should one order a scoop of the top-selling Secret Breakfast, with its much-vaunted combination of bourbon and toasted cornflakes?

Located in the artistic SoMa district, Mixt Greens is a casual, eco-friendly eatery housed in a high-ceilinged space with light wood accents.

This izakaya on Webster Street in the Marina/Cow Hollow district serves sushi and Japanese cuisine with a focus on organic, sustainable ingredients and cage-free eggs.

Limon serves up Peruvian cuisine to diners in the Mission district. Chef-owner Martin Castillo works in an open kitchen and is well known for his innovative dishes, such as the leche de tigre ceviche, cubes of fish, oysters, and sea urchin in a citrus marinade.

Located on the second floor of the upscale Hotel Nikko, Anzu has the typical hotel restaurant atmosphere: white tablecloths paired with neutral-colored furnishings and low lighting.

Richmond-based Tommy's Mexican has been luring diners and tequila aficionados since it opened in 1965. Co-owner Julio Bermejo does not take tequila lightly: His regular trips to Jalisco have earned him the title of U.S. Ambassador to Tequila.

The large, red-framed front windows of Pacific Catch in the Marina open up to wood floors, burnt-orange walls, and bright blue mosaic accents. Here the focus is on large portions of fresh, reasonably priced seafood cooked with Asian flavor and local ingredients.