San Francisco

Restaurants in San Francisco

Restaurants in San Francisco are second-to-none; the city is renowned for its dining scene, and for good reason – it has more restaurants per capita than any other major city in North America. While the city’s fine dining scene is booming – there are countless San Francisco restaurants that will easily set you back more than $100 a person – it’s also very possible to find delicious meals at affordable price points.

San Francisco is particularly well regarded for its Asian cuisine, and locals share an intense obsession with fresh sushi and dim sum, which can be found throughout the city’s bustling Chinatown. North Beach, San Francisco’s Italian district, also enjoys a lively reputation, and pasta lovers would be amiss to skip a visit to Ristorante Ideale. Considered to be one of the best restaurants in San Francisco for Italian food, this trattoria serves handmade gnocchi and ravioli along with a list of well-priced Italian wines.

A general rule of thumb: San Francisco restaurants are typically corkage friendly, so it’s possible to visit nearby Napa wine country, and bring back a bottle or two to enjoy while dining out in the city.

The booths are the best way to enjoy Elite’s California Cajun cuisine. They’re only remaining element of the original space built in 1922, and they offer a unique amount of privacy and charm. Don’t miss the deviled eggs and gunpowder martinis.

Bun Mee’s fusion Vietnamese sandwiches are light enough for lunch but filling enough for dinner. Don’t miss the Belly Bun, piled high with its braised kurobuta pork belly, salted radish relish, pickled carrot and daikon, and jalapeños.

Make a beeline for the back display cases and order Stella’s signature sacripantina, a hard-to-find Genoese specialty. The rum-soaked sponge cake, layered with zabaglione, is somehow both richly creamy and wonderfully light.

Dim sum fanatics often gravitate to the Richmond neighborhood, but this Cantonese spot lures them back to Chinatown. Go for cilantro-spiked shrimp dumplings and xiao long bao (soup dumplings).

This throwback ice cream shop and soda fountain offers both original Prohibition-era recipes and upgrades with old ingredients.

Locals have been standing in line for Pork Store’s delicious diner-style breakfasts since the 1970’s. The hash browns (the second most popular item that starts with “hash” in the neighborhood) and scrambles (both veggie and meat varieties) are well worth the wait.

Cafe Flore’s street-facing patio is one of the Castro’s very best places for brunch in the sunshine. Their house-made oat berries with seasonal fresh fruit is a must order.

An extensive number of top-rate German, Austrian, and Belgian beers on offer makes waiting for this always busy spot’s sausage, sauerkraut, spätzle its own pleasure. For the thirsty, beer is available in a 2-litre boot or a massive 5-litre stein.

A series of shipping containers offering Ritual Roasters’ coffee, Smitten ice cream, Avedano’s meat, and Suppenküche’s beer have turned this once desolate parking lot into a delightful place for people.

The second location of this popular South Indian spot is great for a date night—especially when paired with a show at the Sundance Kabuki Cinema right across the street.

With 29 years of experience under his belt, chef Jan Birnbaum opened Epic Roasthouse in 2008 along with co-owner and acclaimed restaurant architect Pat Kuleto.