Russia Travel Guide

Well-priced caviar, vodka, and pickled herring are among the offerings at this gourmet food market, housed in a newly restored 1903 Art Nouveau building. It's the only grocer in town with antique bronze lamps and intricately patterned painted windows.

Housed in the Mikhailovsky Palace, the Russian works here—which include 6,000 religious icons—makes an interesting complement to the Hermitage's foreign treasures. Liszt and Berlioz gave private concerts in the impressive White Column Hall, a music parlor dating from the 1820's.

The shop stocks 19th-century antiques.

Denis Simachev, a petit, flamboyant dresser with long dark hair and a droopy mustache, recently opened his first flagship—a large building swaddled, like a teapot in its cozy, in Russia's beloved country-folk hohkolovo pattern—on _Stoleshnikov Lane, the main shopping drag.


Keep quiet! Don't drink! Work harder! Clean up on bossy Soviet-era propaganda posters at this bookstore that also stocks English translations of the ultimate Petersburg tale, Crime and Punishment.

Russia's first private brewery occupies an industrial-chic space. The live rock shows, sports on TV, and beers on tap draw an enthusiastic crowd of all ages.

Not to be confused with the Tretyakov Gallery, the more interesting New Tretyakov is in the same building as the Central House of Artists. On the top floor is Moscow's must-see collection of early- 20th-century art—Malevich, Goncharova, Mashkov, Lentulov, Chagall, and more.