Russia

Tips and Articles in Russia

no free rides Travel agents' fees are on the rise For decades, travel agents reminded consumers that their services cost nothing, since they are paid commissions by airlines and other suppliers. But the commissions doled out by major airlines have...
Before the U.S.S.R. broke up in 1991, its national airline, Aeroflot, was generally considered sky-high hell. Foreign travelers were shocked at having to haul their luggage across an icy tarmac. Once aboard, they often stumbled over one another in...
In junior high, some friends and I discovered a way into our town's rain sewers. With cigarette lighters to guide us, we crawled through dark concrete tubes to emerge in a chamber just high enough to stand in. Fifty feet below street level, we'd f...
Ever dreamt of sailing the Neva to visit the czars' summer palace?Or cruising the Rhine, stopping for tastings at vineyards all along the way?Somewhere between traveling by land and by sea lies a blissful medium. It's now possible to sail Europe's...
Svetlana Zakharova is a ballerina—make that prima ballerina—with the fabled Kirov Ballet of St. Petersburg, Russia. When the troupe performs at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York from June 28 to July 10, Svetlana is set to dance the title ro...
I had no idea what Russia would be. If I thought of it, I saw milky white ballerina legs and craning feathered heads. I saw Stalin's fat mustache, Khrushchev banging a shoe at the United Nations, and the birthmark on Gorbachev's head like ink spla...
Barely 24 hours in Moscow and I’ve already ingested a year’s worth of foie gras at a glitzy fashion reception, nearly gotten trampled at the Revolution Square metro station, and been insulted by bus drivers and dill-hawking babushkas because I don...
When I finally got to the coldest town on earth, the first person I met had a frozen fish tucked into one of his felt boots. He was swaying slightly in the headlights of our truck, which had broken down 200 yards short of our final destination. ...
A surprising number of major cities--Moscow, Rome, Washington, and Tokyo among them--haven't set their plans yet, but others are gearing up for major bashes. Berlin A pyrotechnic display will explode over the Brandenburg Gate. The surrounding...
For those who suffer from what Cocteau called the "red-and-gold disease," relief is found only in the glittery, cavernous darkness of an opera house. Yet one does not always enter what Jean Harlow would have called a "rafeened" atmosphere. To be s...
Vodka may rule as the drink of choice in Moscow, but American-style beer is attempting a coup. When the iron curtain lifted, an influx of foreign investment gave decaying breweries a much-needed face-lift. Since then, young trendsetters with sophi...
Earlier this year T+L profiled a new trip to Russia's Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center, which has begun offering week-long space-training courses to civilians ("My Life As a Cosmonaut," January). At the time, the Russian space agency was making p...
I went to Russia for Moscow: new Moscow, in all its trashy splendor; bad old Soviet Moscow, with its thundering skyscrapers and dismal workers' cafés; imperial Moscow — flamboyant, absurd St. Basil's Cathedral, and the grave where Gogol was ...
Like a long-overdue book that's suddenly found in the back of a drawer, the Viipuri Library in Russia, an early masterpiece by Finnish Modernist architect Alvar Aalto once thought to have been destroyed in World War II, has been "rediscovered" and...
I was sitting in a fancy St. Petersburg restaurant, wriggling my nose at a plate of lackluster escargots. Then it dawned on me. Snails—in St. Petersburg! During my last visit, a decade ago—on a side trip from Moscow, where I was born—I'd survived...