Rome

Things to do in Rome

Even if you just stick with the iconic sights— such as the Colosseum, the Trevi Fountain, the Pantheon and the Vatican—you wouldn’t have any problem figuring out things to do in Rome. And there are also plenty of other things to do in Rome underneath the city—seeing the ancient tombs, bones, catacombs and other archeological treasures. An outstanding private collection of the noble Borghese family went public when they lost their fortune in the late 1800’s; today it’s the world’s most perfect small art museum. The works at Borghese Museum & Gallery are immediately impressive and provocative, from ancient Roman mosaics of gory amphitheater scenes to the topless statue of Pauline Bonaparte by Canova. Annibale Gammarelli is a tiny boutique in Old Rome has been an official tailor of papal Cossacks since 1792, but today Roman dandies flock to this Sartoria per Ecclesiastici in search of knee-high socks in cardinal red, bishop purple, or sober black. Rumor has it that a leading fashion designer or two has also been seen in the shop, buying up yards of clerical brocade and silk damask. Cufflinks and gloves are among a selection of ecclesiastic accessories that are popular with fashion-forward types.
As the oldest paper producer in Europe (founded in 1264), Fabriano Boutique not only invented the watermark, but also supplied artists like Michelangelo, Raphael, and Goya. Today, the company’s chain of boutiques still stocks exquisite handmade stationery and cards, as well as leather-bound notebooks, desk accessories, and art supplies. What to do in Rome with kids? Treat them to plenty of gelatos. Gelateria dei Gracchi may look spare, but its fruit flavors deliciously follow the seasons and, grownups will love their chocolate-and-rum frozen sensation, which uses pure fondant rather than the usual cocoa powder.

“Drink, eat, talk” is the motto of this ultra-stylish nightspot fashioned out of a former garage near Campo dei Fiori. Stake out one of the black and white leather 1960’s chairs in the front room when the aperitivo action starts around 6 p.m. with finger foods and Prosecco.

Rome's oldest herbalist sells a vast selection of teas stored in wooden drawers beneath its original coffered ceiling.

The Garden of Orange Trees (Giardino degli Aranci) by the Santa Sabina church pays homage to the namesake Spanish tree.

One of the more charming examples of Rome’s lesser-known, world-class sights is this monumental complex of a late imperial burial chamber, an early Christian basilica, and, for good measure, some catacombs. The fourth-century mausoleum of St.

The Site: This riotously baroque 17th-century church is most famous for Bernini's lavish Cornaro Chapel.

For 200 years, Pasticceria il Boccione has been baking kosher treats for Rome’s Jewish community.

Located in the Olympic Village, the Parco della Musica (Music Park) is the largest and most visited concert facility in Europe. Designed by world-renowned architect Renzo Piano, the venue consists of three concert halls surrounding an ancient Roman—style outdoor theater.

When the light hits just right, it streams in from cleverly hidden windows, and Borromini's splendid dome appears to hover above the 17th-century church.

 

Multi-tasking travelers on can freshen up their laundry while on layover at Clean Life Dry Cleaning in the arrivals terminal Leonardo da Vinci-Fiumicino Airport in Rome. For about $4 per item, patrons can have their clothing cleaned, pressed, and ready to wear for the next destination. 

The name says it all: this shop is Candyland for mid-century-design freaks. You’ll find furniture, ceramics, glassware, lamps, jewelry, and other home accessories from the 1940’s to the 1970’s from Italian, Scandinavian, British, and American design firms.

Since 1909, Villa Aurelia has been the property of the American Academy in Rome. In 2002, the property reopened with much fanfare.