Rome Travel Guide

Located in the Olympic Village, the Parco della Musica (Music Park) is the largest and most visited concert facility in Europe. Designed by world-renowned architect Renzo Piano, the venue consists of three concert halls surrounding an ancient Roman—style outdoor theater.

When the light hits just right, it streams in from cleverly hidden windows, and Borromini's splendid dome appears to hover above the 17th-century church.


Multi-tasking travelers on can freshen up their laundry while on layover at Clean Life Dry Cleaning in the arrivals terminal Leonardo da Vinci-Fiumicino Airport in Rome. For about $4 per item, patrons can have their clothing cleaned, pressed, and ready to wear for the next destination. 

Originally built in the fifth century, Santa Maria Maggiore contains one of the best preserved Byzantine interiors in Rome. Along the tall, wide nave, fifth-century mosaics feature some of the oldest depictions of the Virgin Mary in existence.

A peek in the window reveals light pink walls, soft lighting, and minimal decor because at Josephine de Huertas & Co., it’s all about the clothes, accessories, and shoes, of course. This is where Romans get their fix of designers like Chloé, Missoni, Alberta Ferretti, and Anya Hindmarch.

For a healthy pick-me-up, head to My Juice in the MyChef food court at Leonardo da Vinci – Fiumicino Airport in Rome. The focus here is on acentrifugato — a blended fresh mixed fruit or vegetable smoothie.

Dedicated to all the gods by Marcus Agrippa in 27 B.C., the iconic Pantheon in Rome's Centro Storico has twice burned and been rebuilt before assuming its current appearance under the reign of Hadrian. Conversion to a church in 609 A.D.

EUR: Via Cristoforo Colombo at Piazza Guglielmo Marconi and surroundings.


Foro Italico: Lungotevere Maresciallo Cadorna at Ponte Duca d’Aosta

The Site: In the year 590, as he prayed for Rome's deliverance from a plague, St. Gregory the Great had a encouraging vision of an angel sheathing its sword above this massive brick castle built atop the drum of Hadrian's first-century mausoleum.

The name says it all: this shop is Candyland for mid-century-design freaks. You’ll find furniture, ceramics, glassware, lamps, jewelry, and other home accessories from the 1940’s to the 1970’s from Italian, Scandinavian, British, and American design firms.