Rome

Rome Travel Guide

Just a few blocks from the Pantheon in a fabulously secluded piazza, this indoor/outdoor lounge bar is one of the most congenial places for a drink in the Centro Storico.

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This all-in-one emporium sells clothes, shoes, accessories, and perfumes by popular houses like Alessandro dell'Acqua and Balenciaga.

If the Palazzo Esposizioni is lots of things to a wide audience, the Museum for the Art of the Twenty-First Century, which opened in the summer of 2010, proposes a more resolutely contemporary agenda: solo shows from first-rate artists such as South African William Kentridge and arte povera

What to Expect: Romans erect elaborate presepi (Nativity scenes) across the city, from life-size tableaux on the Spanish Steps and before St.

The displays at this tiny exhibit set out to prove that there is a place between heaven and hell. Among the items of "proof": fingerprints burned into a book, supposedly by a tormented soul.

In transit business travelers make use of long layovers at this more than 9,000-square-foot temporary office space. There are six rooms in which to get work finished, as well as three meeting rooms.

Started in 1982, this interior design shop takes its namesake from owner Ilaria Miani, an Italian interior designer who is known for her proficiency in Italian rustic architecture and blending ancient and modern designs.

Famous for its luxurious cotton socks in bright, multicolored stripes, this Italian label also makes similarly vibrant clothes and accessories for men, women, and kids. Candy-colored bathing suits, neckties, tote bags, and sneakers make terrific sartorial souvenirs.

The Museo d'Arte Contemporanea di Roma (MACRO) is a contemporary art museum comprised of two separate locations. The original museum is housed in the restored 20th-century Peroni brewery with a glass-and-steel extension added by French architect Odile Decq.

The Site: Today a busy traffic circle, the piazza centers on Bernini's masterpiece fountain of a Triton (merman) spouting water into the air from a shell held to his lips.

Though there may no longer be gladiators and staged naval battles at Rome’s iconic Colosseum, it’s still a great hive of activity in central Rome.

Nearly 20,000 people stream through the Vatican every day, clueless and adrift, and end up dismissing the Sistine Chapel before they even get there. It’s almost impossible to appreciate the Vatican without an experienced guide.