Rome

Rome Travel Guide

The Cimitero Acattolico (Non-Catholic Cemetery), also known as the Protestant Cemetery, is home to one of the largest collections of notable graves in the world.

Rome has more than 900 churches, all of them free, displaying great works of Renaissance and Baroque art and architecture by the likes of Raphael, Bernini, Caravaggio, Bramante, Pinturricchio, and Annibale Carracci—and that's just the shortlist of artists contained in one church, the little-visit

The oldest paper producer in Europe (founded in 1264), Fabriano not only invented the watermark, but also supplied artists like Michelangelo, Raphael, and Goya.

The Site: This riotously baroque 17th-century church is most famous for Bernini's lavish Cornaro Chapel.

For 200 years, Pasticceria il Boccione has been baking kosher treats for Rome’s Jewish community.

One of the more charming examples of Rome’s lesser-known, world-class sights is this monumental complex of a late imperial burial chamber, an early Christian basilica, and, for good measure, some catacombs. The fourth-century mausoleum of St.

This 17th century villa stakes claim in the largest landscaped public park in Rome. Situated just outside Porta San Pancrazio, it was known as Bel Respiro, or “beautiful breath,” for its panoramic views of the city.

You’ll see fashionable people all over town—punky Japanese tourists to preppy Roman men—carrying these shopping bags.

Roman dandies flock to this Sartoria per Ecclesiastici in search of knee-high socks in cardinal red, bishop purple, or sober black; the fine-knits make them perfect for wearing under Gucci loafers.

Only about 35 percent of ancient Rome is in open-air excavations; the rest of it lies hidden below street level.

The designer opened his Roman atelier in 1960, and his timeless sensibility lives on at the landmark boutique with its red-carpeted staircase and dizzyingly high-heeled pumps.

It took a decade to build the Scuderie del Quirinale (1722-1732) in Rome. Located next to the Quirinale Palace, it sits atop the ruins of the Roman Temple of Serapide and serves as an event, educational, and exhibition space.