Rome Travel Guide

The Museo d'Arte Contemporanea di Roma (MACRO) is a contemporary art museum comprised of two separate locations. The original museum is housed in the restored 20th-century Peroni brewery with a glass-and-steel extension added by French architect Odile Decq.

Started in 1982, this interior design shop takes its namesake from owner Ilaria Miani, an Italian interior designer who is known for her proficiency in Italian rustic architecture and blending ancient and modern designs.

Famous for its luxurious cotton socks in bright, multicolored stripes, this Italian label also makes similarly vibrant clothes and accessories for men, women, and kids. Candy-colored bathing suits, neckties, tote bags, and sneakers make terrific sartorial souvenirs.

The Site: Today a busy traffic circle, the piazza centers on Bernini's masterpiece fountain of a Triton (merman) spouting water into the air from a shell held to his lips.

Though there may no longer be gladiators and staged naval battles at Rome’s iconic Colosseum, it’s still a great hive of activity in central Rome.

Nearly 20,000 people stream through the Vatican every day, clueless and adrift, and end up dismissing the Sistine Chapel before they even get there. It’s almost impossible to appreciate the Vatican without an experienced guide.

It's been said that Janiculum Hill served as the center of the cult of the god Janus. Because of the hill’s advantageous position, the cult’s priests would use it as a lookout point for signs from the gods.

You’ll see fashionable people all over town—punky Japanese tourists to preppy Roman men—carrying these shopping bags.

Once farmacia to the 17th Century Papal court, this pharmacy is still run by Carmelite monks and remains adjacent to Trastavere's Santa Maria della Scala church. The classically designed space is worth a visit for the decor alone: a marble room decorated with murals of medicinal herbs.

Coffee in Italy (and the culture that surrounds it) is a completely different animal than what you’re used to back home (e.g., Starbucks). When in Rome, stop in for caffè and cappuccino at as many different bars as you can.

Rome's hippest nightclubs are located among the reclaimed industrial buildings in Testaccio. As of late, this sleek dance club is the favorite of the clubbers that mingle around Via Galvani.

Gracchi looks spare—clinical even. But a just-delivered crate of wild strawberries fragrantly reassures you. So does Gracchi’s pistachio gelato, considered Rome’s best. It’s alive with the flavor of fresh-roasted Bronte nuts from the slopes of Mount Etna.