Rome

Rome Travel Guide

Regardless of your faith, encountering the splendid ceremony of the Catholic Church can be one of the most memorable events on a trip to Rome.

A longtime favorite of the artsy crowd who mingles here—and who know it simply as La Vineria. Its walls are lined with 600 wine labels.

Italy’s largest airport served more than 36 million passengers in 2010. Located in Fiumicino, approximately 20 miles from Rome’s historic center, this bustling airport is a hub for Alitalia.

Located in San Giovanni, this small, basilica-style church is dedicated to the virgin martyr Saint Bibiana. Originally built in 467, the church was restored in 1224 and again in 1624, when Bernini built the present pale-yellow façade—his first architectural design.

A complex of museums and galleries founded by popes Clement XIV and Pius VI, the Vatican Museums contain a wealth of historical items and artistic works in the form of archeological findings, sculptures, mosaics, statue, and frescoes.

The only airport outlets for this über-chic Italian fashion label are in Rome, so if you missed the dazzling main outlet on Via Condotti, head to Terminal B for shoes and accessories—leather purses (women), chunky studded belts (men), or snakeskin-patterned leashes (Fido)—or to the Terminal C sat

Rome’s oldest ice cream parlor, Giolitti has a history dating back to 1890, when dairy farmers Giuseppe and Bernadina Giolitti opened a small creamery near the Pantheon. Soon after, the Giolittis established a series of shops and began producing ice cream using secret family recipes.

The outstanding private collection of the noble Borghese family went public when they lost their fortune in the late 1800’s; today it’s the world’s most perfect small art museum.

The Site: This long oval piazza—owing its shape to the ancient Stadium of Domitian, formerly on this spot, and often flooded in the 19th century for mock naval battles—is one of Rome's most popular and pretty squares, with café tables and street artists surrounding Bernini's extr

Named after King Louis IX, this church was built as a house of worship for French people living in Rome in 1518. The Italian marble façade and interior with touches of gold was constructed with funds from Catherine de Medici, who was married to King Henry II of France.

Take a “time out” from the hustle and bustle of Rome and wander the gravel paths of public park Villa Sciarra, named after the adjacent 17th-century Barberini family villa.

There are no lavish, aspirational lifestyle displays à la Williams-Sonoma at this excellent back-to-basics cookware emporium; instead, the utilitarian racks overflow with nondecorative tools made of wood and stainless steel plus simple machines like tomato mills or Bialetti stove-top espresso mak