Rome

Rome Travel Guide

Even if you just stick with the iconic sights— such as the Colosseum, the Trevi Fountain, the Pantheon and the Vatican—you wouldn’t have any problem figuring out things to do in Rome. And there are also plenty of other things to do in Rome underneath the city—seeing the ancient tombs, bones, catacombs and other archeological treasures. An outstanding private collection of the noble Borghese family went public when they lost their fortune in the late 1800’s; today it’s the world’s most perfect small art museum. The works at Borghese Museum & Gallery are immediately impressive and provocative, from ancient Roman mosaics of gory amphitheater scenes to the topless statue of Pauline Bonaparte by Canova. Annibale Gammarelli is a tiny boutique in Old Rome has been an official tailor of papal Cossacks since 1792, but today Roman dandies flock to this Sartoria per Ecclesiastici in search of knee-high socks in cardinal red, bishop purple, or sober black. Rumor has it that a leading fashion designer or two has also been seen in the shop, buying up yards of clerical brocade and silk damask. Cufflinks and gloves are among a selection of ecclesiastic accessories that are popular with fashion-forward types.
As the oldest paper producer in Europe (founded in 1264), Fabriano Boutique not only invented the watermark, but also supplied artists like Michelangelo, Raphael, and Goya. Today, the company’s chain of boutiques still stocks exquisite handmade stationery and cards, as well as leather-bound notebooks, desk accessories, and art supplies. What to do in Rome with kids? Treat them to plenty of gelatos. Gelateria dei Gracchi may look spare, but its fruit flavors deliciously follow the seasons and, grownups will love their chocolate-and-rum frozen sensation, which uses pure fondant rather than the usual cocoa powder.

Dedicated to all the gods by Marcus Agrippa in 27 B.C., the iconic Pantheon in Rome's Centro Storico has twice burned and been rebuilt before assuming its current appearance under the reign of Hadrian. Conversion to a church in 609 A.D.

EUR: Via Cristoforo Colombo at Piazza Guglielmo Marconi and surroundings.

 

Foro Italico: Lungotevere Maresciallo Cadorna at Ponte Duca d’Aosta

The Site: In the year 590, as he prayed for Rome's deliverance from a plague, St. Gregory the Great had a encouraging vision of an angel sheathing its sword above this massive brick castle built atop the drum of Hadrian's first-century mausoleum.

The name says it all: this shop is Candyland for mid-century-design freaks. You’ll find furniture, ceramics, glassware, lamps, jewelry, and other home accessories from the 1940’s to the 1970’s from Italian, Scandinavian, British, and American design firms.

Since 1909, Villa Aurelia has been the property of the American Academy in Rome. In 2002, the property reopened with much fanfare.

Regardless of your faith, encountering the splendid ceremony of the Catholic Church can be one of the most memorable events on a trip to Rome.

A longtime favorite of the artsy crowd who mingles here—and who know it simply as La Vineria. Its walls are lined with 600 wine labels.

Italy’s largest airport served more than 36 million passengers in 2010. Located in Fiumicino, approximately 20 miles from Rome’s historic center, this bustling airport is a hub for Alitalia.

Located in San Giovanni, this small, basilica-style church is dedicated to the virgin martyr Saint Bibiana. Originally built in 467, the church was restored in 1224 and again in 1624, when Bernini built the present pale-yellow façade—his first architectural design.

A complex of museums and galleries founded by popes Clement XIV and Pius VI, the Vatican Museums contain a wealth of historical items and artistic works in the form of archeological findings, sculptures, mosaics, statue, and frescoes.