Rome Travel Guide

Rome’s oldest ice cream parlor, Giolitti has a history dating back to 1890, when dairy farmers Giuseppe and Bernadina Giolitti opened a small creamery near the Pantheon. Soon after, the Giolittis established a series of shops and began producing ice cream using secret family recipes.

The outstanding private collection of the noble Borghese family went public when they lost their fortune in the late 1800’s; today it’s the world’s most perfect small art museum.

The Site: This long oval piazza—owing its shape to the ancient Stadium of Domitian, formerly on this spot, and often flooded in the 19th century for mock naval battles—is one of Rome's most popular and pretty squares, with café tables and street artists surrounding Bernini's extr

There are no lavish, aspirational lifestyle displays à la Williams-Sonoma at this excellent back-to-basics cookware emporium; instead, the utilitarian racks overflow with nondecorative tools made of wood and stainless steel plus simple machines like tomato mills or Bialetti stove-top espresso mak

Named after King Louis IX, this church was built as a house of worship for French people living in Rome in 1518. The Italian marble façade and interior with touches of gold was constructed with funds from Catherine de Medici, who was married to King Henry II of France.

Take a “time out” from the hustle and bustle of Rome and wander the gravel paths of public park Villa Sciarra, named after the adjacent 17th-century Barberini family villa.

If the Palazzo Esposizioni is lots of things to a wide audience, the Museum for the Art of the Twenty-First Century, which opened in the summer of 2010, proposes a more resolutely contemporary agenda: solo shows from first-rate artists such as South African William Kentridge and arte povera

Just a few blocks from the Pantheon in a fabulously secluded piazza, this indoor/outdoor lounge bar is one of the most congenial places for a drink in the Centro Storico.


This all-in-one emporium sells clothes, shoes, accessories, and perfumes by popular houses like Alessandro dell'Acqua and Balenciaga.

What to Expect: Romans erect elaborate presepi (Nativity scenes) across the city, from life-size tableaux on the Spanish Steps and before St.

The displays at this tiny exhibit set out to prove that there is a place between heaven and hell. Among the items of "proof": fingerprints burned into a book, supposedly by a tormented soul.

In transit business travelers make use of long layovers at this more than 9,000-square-foot temporary office space. There are six rooms in which to get work finished, as well as three meeting rooms.