Restaurants in Rome

Established in 1938, Pierluigi continues to serve authentic Italian food Campo dei Fiori neighborhood of Rome with a commitment to seasonality, tradition and creativity.

This trattoria in the Prati neighborhood serves up classic Italian regional dishes with modern twists. Suppli, fried tidbits of rice, ground meat, mozzarella, and tomato sauce are presented in sections of cardboard egg cartons one day and colorful paper cones the next.

Not to be confused with the touristy “La Carbonara” on Campo dei Fiori, this hundred-year-old trattoria on a quiet street in Monti is a cozy and hip place to feast on homey, unfussy cucina Romana.

Opened in 2003, this library/café in the Pigneto district provides a destination for those seeking a good read, a cup of coffee, an organic snack, and spirited conversation. The interior boasts bookshelves and several small tables.

Just finding the entrance to Sora Margherita is part of the experience at this hole-in-the-wall trattoria in the old Jewish ghetto.

In the Lazio region, Salvatore Tiscione carries on the duty of chef at this Italian trattoria. Opened in 1936 and still operated by the Trivelloni family, the restaurant has a classic design with black and white checkered floors, soft woods and brick covering the walls, and white table cloths.

A vestige of a simpler time, Caffè Doria is an classic, sit-down Roman coffee house with an interior marble fountain, dark wooden paneling, and formal portraits hanging on the wall.

Run by the same proprietors who own Casa Bleve—one of Rome’s best enotecas—this wine bar chain offers an impressive list of vintages (including many from the owners’ own Tuscan vineyard, Marchesi de’ Frescobaldi).

Located in Testacchio and established in 1911, Perilli is a great pick for those seeking a Roman dining experience away from touristy crowds. Perilli serves authentic Roman fare with a bounty of meat, pasta, and of course, offal (calf intestines, for instance).