Rome

Hotels in Rome

The selection of hotels in Rome has, in the past, tended toward extremes: over-the-top luxury and cringe-worthy budget options. In the past several years, however, the less expensive choices (say, around the Termini station) have gotten spruced up. If you come during the summer be sure to ask if your room will be air-conditioned (you’ll want it, and it’s not always a given in smaller hotels). Find the perfect stay at some of the best hotels in Rome.

Hassler Roma is an elegant grande dame Rome hotel. Grace Kelly honeymooned here, and it’s still the hotel of choice for many of today’s celebs. The 96 stately rooms in at this 1930s palace on top of the Spanish Steps embody good taste, with the gilded furniture, antiques, and lots of marble. And the concierges can accommodate just about any request—say, mapping out routes through the Villa Borghese gardens. The Babuino 181 is a contemporary boutique hotel near the Spanish Steps and has lovely original details—a cast-iron railing and Italian marble staircase—as well as a new and marvelous rooftop bar. The D'Inghilterra, a Rome hotel that opened in the 19th century, has a rep that spans the centuries: it has counted as guests both Elizabeth Taylor and Ernest Hemingway.

The oldest inn in the city, in a rambling, ocher-washed 15th-century palazzo off lively Campo dei Fiori, is as authentically Roman a place to stay as you’ll find in this price range.

Located near the Borghese Gardens in Paroli, the five-star Lord Byron hotel has a standard white exterior and a quieter location away from the city's noisier areas. Each of the 32 rooms and suites at the hotel have been restored in a 1930's art-deco style, but no two rooms are alike.

With its original Art Deco style rooms, a prestigious location on Via Veneto near the Spanish Steps, and suites that recall the splendor of the Dolce Vita, this Belle Époque property continues to be an popular option near many prime Rome sites.

A favorite of Italian politicians, the ivy-covered Hotel Raphael is located just outside the Piazza Navona, within walking distance of the Pantheon and Spanish Steps.

It has perhaps the most enviable physical visage of all Roman hotels—a wood and masonry former cloister—where rooms are arranged around an orange grove in the absolute heart of Trastevere.

Built over Emperor Diocletian’s third-century baths in Piazza della Repubblica, the Hotel Exedra is housed in a white marble Neoclassical palace dating from the late 1800’s. Inside are 238 guestrooms with high ceilings, marble floors, silk wall coverings, and faux-crocodile headboards.

Small and luxurious, with Neoclassical overtones, this early-20th-century villa—on a side street on patrician Quirinal Hill—is also refined and subtle: a small brass plaque and bell are all that distinguish it from its neighbors.

Sepia-toned photographic murals of iconic Roman monuments set the tone. This palazzo near the Spanish Steps retains original details—a cast-iron railing and Italian marble staircase—and, come this spring, will have a marvelous rooftop bar for aperitivos.

It may be a 20-minute walk to the Spanish Steps, but the Parco dei Principi setting, tucked away beside Rome’s biggest park, Villa Borghese, means fewer tourists and less traffic for arriving travelers who prefer quieter hotels in residential neighborhoods to the city’s more typical hotel cluster

The 10 exceptionally tranquil rooms at this year-old boutique hotel offer outstanding value for the amenities and location: a vine-covered alley off antiques thoroughfare Via dei Coronari.

When it comes to glamorous hotels in Rome, few exceed the Hotel Majestic on fashionable Via Veneto. Built in 1889 by renowned architect Gaetano Koch, the Neoclassical property catered to generations of glitterati and served as a backdrop for Federico Fellini’s 1960 film La Dolce Vita.

This 12-room, ivy-draped hotel sits in the crook of a tiny lane between the busy Via Nazionale and the Forum. Ignore the cramped reception area and peek into the cavernous, 2,000-year-old crypt behind the concierge desk, on which the 17th-century building stands.