Rome

Things to do in Rome

Even if you just stick with the iconic sights— such as the Colosseum, the Trevi Fountain, the Pantheon and the Vatican—you wouldn’t have any problem figuring out things to do in Rome. And there are also plenty of other things to do in Rome underneath the city—seeing the ancient tombs, bones, catacombs and other archeological treasures. An outstanding private collection of the noble Borghese family went public when they lost their fortune in the late 1800’s; today it’s the world’s most perfect small art museum. The works at Borghese Museum & Gallery are immediately impressive and provocative, from ancient Roman mosaics of gory amphitheater scenes to the topless statue of Pauline Bonaparte by Canova. Annibale Gammarelli is a tiny boutique in Old Rome has been an official tailor of papal Cossacks since 1792, but today Roman dandies flock to this Sartoria per Ecclesiastici in search of knee-high socks in cardinal red, bishop purple, or sober black. Rumor has it that a leading fashion designer or two has also been seen in the shop, buying up yards of clerical brocade and silk damask. Cufflinks and gloves are among a selection of ecclesiastic accessories that are popular with fashion-forward types.
As the oldest paper producer in Europe (founded in 1264), Fabriano Boutique not only invented the watermark, but also supplied artists like Michelangelo, Raphael, and Goya. Today, the company’s chain of boutiques still stocks exquisite handmade stationery and cards, as well as leather-bound notebooks, desk accessories, and art supplies. What to do in Rome with kids? Treat them to plenty of gelatos. Gelateria dei Gracchi may look spare, but its fruit flavors deliciously follow the seasons and, grownups will love their chocolate-and-rum frozen sensation, which uses pure fondant rather than the usual cocoa powder.

It's been said that Janiculum Hill served as the center of the cult of the god Janus. Because of the hill’s advantageous position, the cult’s priests would use it as a lookout point for signs from the gods.

You’ll see fashionable people all over town—punky Japanese tourists to preppy Roman men—carrying these shopping bags.

Once farmacia to the 17th Century Papal court, this pharmacy is still run by Carmelite monks and remains adjacent to Trastavere's Santa Maria della Scala church. The classically designed space is worth a visit for the decor alone: a marble room decorated with murals of medicinal herbs.

Flocks of tourist visiting the Eternal City come to throw a coin into the Trevi Fountain in the Campo Marzio neighborhood. This famous fountain was designed by Nicolo Salvi and completed in 1762; it is the largest Baroque fountain in the city and is a supreme example of the style.

Built in 1504 and attached to the church of Santa Maria della Pace in Rome’s Centro Storico, Chiostro del Bramante was one of architect Donato Bramante’s first projects in the Eternal City.

This venerable chocolate company, founded in Turin in 1878, prides itself on its natural ingredients and artisanal origins. The shop sells beautifully packaged chocolates in a variety of forms (from bars to individually wrapped tartufi to cubotti—small blocks).

Located in the very center of Rome, Via Marsala serves as a hub for trains and buses yet is also within walking distance of major attractions.

This large, privately owned art collection is housed in the Palazzo Doria Pamphilj. The estate includes works from Tintoretto, Caravaggio, Tiziano, and most famously, Velázquez's portrait of Pope Innocent X, who was himself a member of the Pamphilj family.

The satellite location of a chic city salon chain, Bunny’s offers a full menu of beauty services to revive bedraggled travelers: haircuts and styling, tanning beds, full-body massages, waxing…there’s even a vibrating Full Tonic treatment that promises to reduce cellulite and improve circulation.

Located in Old Rome, just a short stroll from the Gothic, Basilica di Santa Maria sopra Minerva in Piazza della Minerva, this little shop sells beautiful sacred art and religious items that will appeal to the devout and collectors alike.

More than 1,000 roses bloom late each spring at Rome's Municipal Rose Garden on the eastern side of the Aventine Hill. The sloping garden is divided into two sections separated by Via di Valle Murcia.

You’ll see fashionable people all over town—punky Japanese tourists to preppy Roman men—carrying these shopping bags.