Rio de Janeiro

Restaurants in Rio de Janeiro

Choose among Rio de Janeiro restaurants and you’ll find plenty of churrascarias (with grilled meats) as well as low-key botecos (bars with food), great seafood and a wide range of international fare, from Italian to French and Asian. The classic dish at many local Rio de Janeiro restaurants, however, is the good ol’ comfort food meal of meat, rice and beans. Here's where to start when trying the best restaurants in Rio de Janeiro:

Satyricon is a Rio de Janeiro restaurant that displays its fresh catches—lobster, oysters, shrimp, and whole fish—near the restaurant entrance, and it cooks up this South Atlantic seafood into Italian- and Mediterranean-style dishes. The house specialty is the pargo, or fish crusted in rock salt and baked. The stylish, soft-toned dining room is often busy with a social and well-dressed crowd thanks, in part, to past celebrity visits from the likes of Sting and Madonna.

With locations in Ipanema and Aterro do Flamengo, Porcão is a Rio de Janeiro restaurant that offers a Carnival for carnivores at this riodizio-style churrascaria, where beach-tanned waiters slice up skewer after skewer of beef, pork, or poultry until you flip a coaster that says "stop." To supplement your protein bonanza, help yourself to the salad bar, which features hearts of palm and sushi and ceviche galore.

A perfect lunch destination for Ipanema shoppers. In the tastefully underdone, concrete-floored space, genial young staffers serve Italian standards both traditional (pizza alla Margherita) and adventurous (tramezzini with salmon tartare).

It's Carnivale for carnivores at this riodizio-style churrascaria, where beach-tanned waiters slice up skewer after skewer of beef, pork, or poultry until you flip a coaster that says "stop." To supplement your protein bonanza, help yourself to the salad bar, which features hearts of palm and sus

It's Carnivale for carnivores at this riodizio-style churrascaria, where beach-tanned waiters slice up skewer after skewer of beef, pork, or poultry until you flip a coaster that says "stop." To supplement your protein bonanza, help yourself to the salad bar, which features hearts of palm and sus

The family has run restaurants in São Paulo since 1902, and a fourth-generation member of the Fasanos heads the Italian fare and classically styled dining room at Gero. Outside, the single-story brick building looks rather basic.

A two-floor bar that fronts Copacabana beach, Copa Café is all contrasts: stark black floors, deep red accents, and white bar chairs. The electronic music and bold atmosphere attract a crowd of young and stylish professionals sipping cocktails.

Using Brazilian ingredients like cassava and açaí, chef Claude Troisgros (a generation of the family famous for attaining Michelin stars) produces French cuisine that’s considered some of the best in Rio.

Flavors of the Mediterranean (Provençal risotto with octopus, crisp goat-cheese and lavender-honey salad) have zingy Asian accents (shiitake-mushroom fricassee with Asian spring rolls) at this favorite among chic Leblon residents.

Whether thirsting for Brazilian espumante (sparkling wine) or Krug, the cognoscenti of Carioca—as locals are known—head to this champagnheria

The name Siri Mole & Cia comes from a species of Brazilian soft-shell crab, and the seafood cuisine at this restaurant is also from the coast—specifically from the northeastern state of Bahia. Appetizers include a plate of crab legs and mussels steamed in broth.

The spare, blond-wood interior will have you thinking you took a wrong turn to Stockholm, but the food is all about the tropical accents: foie gras in a citrus coulis, cod with ginger-coconut sauce. The wine list ranges from neighboring Chile and Argentina to Languedoc.

Satyricon displays its fresh catches—including lobster, oysters, shrimp, and whole fish—near the restaurant entrance, and it cooks up this South Atlantic seafood into Italian- and Mediterranean-style dishes. The house specialty is the pargo, or fish crusted in rock salt and baked.

After a hard day on the beach, step up to the counter and choose from 80 flavored sorbets and ice creams. The standards are rich and satisfying, but the wildly exotic tropical-fruit flavors—tangy star fruit, nutty açai—are the must-haves.