Reykjavik

Reykjavik Travel Guide

Travel to Reykjavik to experience the wild and wacky capital of Iceland. With a population of only 120,000, Reykjavik may seem like a small city, but what it lacks in people it makes up for in culture. Whether you plan on spending your vacation gallery hopping while listening to Bjork on repeat or scuba diving between tectonic plates (yes, really!), Reykjavik travel has much to offer.

Consult Travel + Leisure's Reykjavik travel guide for all you need to know about Iceland's capital city and cultural hub.

Things Not to Miss in Reykjavik

• With 40 annual festivals and events it is difficult to visit Reykjavik without witnessing some of the many celebrations.
 • Tour the Golden Circle to see the many wonders of Iceland's unique and spectacular landscape, including erupting geysers, sheer glacial cliffs, cascading waterfalls and extinct volcanoes.
 • The Viking Maritime Museum is a great place for both adults and children to learn about Iceland's rich saltwater history and heritage.
 • You can't leave Reykjavik without visiting one of the geothermal pools at Nauthhólsvík beach or Laugardalslaug.

When to Go to Reykjavik

The summer from June to August is the best time of year to visit Reykjavik when temperatures hit highs in mid fifties and days run together with up to 20 hours of sunlight. However, the hotel rates and travel prices reflect the short season, and so May and September are better times to visit for travelers on a budget. The winter is very cold and dark (only four hours of sunlight) and best avoided by those who aren't used to the polar climate.

Articles about Reykjavik

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