Recoleta

Restaurants in Recoleta

Compare Malbecs from Argentina’s different regions around this tall
marble tasting bar. Here, superman sommelier Marcelo Rebolé oversees a
7,000-bottle cellar with some five dozen by-the-glass offerings
complemented by house-aged cheeses.

A refreshing alternative to the city’s ubiquitous steakhouses, Oviedo is a Spanish-inspired seafood restaurant in the Recoleta neighborhood. Inside, glass orb chandeliers illuminate the dining room, which is decorated with dark mahogany trim, classic white tablecloths, and ocean-themed artwork.

Chef Jean Paul Bondoux hails from the Bourgogne region of France; in 1993, he opened this restaurant that specializes in cuisine from his homeland, at the Alvear Palace Hotel.

Located in the affluent Puerto Madero neighborhood and within walking distance of a handful of high-end hotel chains, this steakhouse serves the usual lineup of Argentinean parilla beef, principally to tourists.

Tucked behind the Four Seasons hotel is La Mansion, an 88-year-old Belle Époque mansion built by Felix Alzaga Unzué as a wedding gift for his wife. Four Seasons dropped $1 million on a restoration of the regal building’s frescoes, marble, and 24-karat-gold-trimmed wood paneling.

Tucked away in Recoleta, this rustic nook with red leatherette booths is home to the town’s best empanadas. Flash-baked to order, the pastries arrive blistered and plump with creamed corn, mozzarella and basil, or hand-chopped beef sweetened with onions.

The interiors here are taberna-meets-brasserie, and while the Porteño grilled-beef classics are exemplary, well-heeled Recoleta regulars come for the expertly sizzled parillada de mar (seafood grill).

Argentines take their empanadas (meat- and vegetable-filled pastries) seriously, and many claim that the tiny, 30-year-old La Cocina has the best around.

Located in the Recoleta neighborhood, Cumaná serves both Argentine dishes and non-traditional fare like wood-fired pizzas. Lanterns and shelves of ornamental bottles decorate the bright, orange walls.

Since its opening in 1866, the storied French Club has drawn generations of politicians and writers. While the city’s intelligentsia still congregates at the lobby bar, the upper floor was recently turned into a 28-room hotel filled with antiques and period furniture.