Recoleta

Things to do in Recoleta

Stop by for a glass of Malbec and some tapas at this industrial, concrete-walled wine bar, softened by thousands of candles placed all around.

A hippie-chic home-and-fashion store selling filmy, embroidered dresses and Nakashima-reminiscent furniture wrought in native woods like lapacho and cohiue.

Evoking the laboratory-style new wave Italian gelateria, this high-design mini-chain keeps it cool with 65 intensely flavored creations under gleaming stainless-steel lids.

For foodie souvenirs, visit the new gourmet market in Recoleta.

A family of German immigrants opened this marroquinería (leather-store) across from Plaza San Martin in 1943. The shelves are stocked with handcrafted handbags, apparel, and accessories for women and men.

In this tiny second-floor store, shoppers sit on leopard-skin benches as they try on the dagger-heeled tango shoes that cofounder (and accomplished tango dancer) Alicia Muñiz says redefined the Argentine dance.

With more than 4,700 ornate stone crypts laid out along a streetlike grid, this graveyard is an architectural masterpiece, and an eerie miniature city for the wealthy dead (and more than a few cats).

This celadon and white chocolatería, creates extraordinary confections in the form of automobiles, teddies, hats, and what is practically a national symbol—the tango shoe, rendered in white Belgian chocolate.

Despite—or maybe because of—its chandeliers and dramatic glass ceiling, some visitors will find Patio Bullrich, considered the town’s most prestigious mall, just a tad too sterile; others will be amused to discover a McDonald’s and a Christian Lacroix under the same roof.

Buenos Aires Design features more than 60 different shops. Situated on a hill next to the famous Recoleta Cemetery, the center showcases the best of contemporary B.A. home design.

The satisfying aroma of leather greets you as you enter Arandú, which is dedicated to handicrafts. Stock up on woven bracelets, suede hunting bags, needlepoint belts, and alpaca-silver picture frames. Burnished riding boots are remarkably underpriced at around $350.