Quebec City

Quebec City Travel Guide

Rising from a bustling plaza in the center of Upper Town, this impressive cathedral belongs to the oldest parish in North America. Rebuilt twice since its completion in 1647, the Neoclassical structure retains its original bell tower and portions of the 17th-century walls.

La Barberie is not a place for a haircut, but a longtime microbrewery at the crossroads of the Saint-Roch district and the entrance to Lower Town.

The oldest grocer on the continent stocks English teas, French soaps, and picnic fixings (our favorites: wild boar sausage and a wedge of locally made Cumulus cheese).

The skating rink at Place d'Youville, in windswept Upper Town, is always packed.

Sitting like a five-pointed star among The Plains of Abraham and just above Terrasse Dufferin, La Citadelle de Québec is a still-active military base (home to the French-speaking Royal 22nd Regiment) and a complex of buildings and fortifications built circa 1820.

Le Paingrüel is one of the most popular boulangeries in Quebec City. Located in the heart of the St.-Jean-Baptiste district, the bakery is housed in a red-brick building with a wood-and-glass storefront on the first floor.

Terrasse Dufferin, which is perched just below the iconic Fairmont Château le Frontenac, is a public park with sweeping vistas of the St. Lawrence River.

Quebec’s answer to American Apparel—a source for eco-friendly basics like perfectly fitting tees and baby-soft hoodies, all made in the province.

Musée National des Beaux-Arts du Quebec houses Canada’s largest national art collection. Set inside three Battlefield Park (also known as "The Plains of Abraham") buildings, the museum includes almost a dozen permanent collections and world-class traveling exhibits.

The Plains of Abraham is one of Canada’s most scenic monuments, as well as hallowed ground for French and British soldiers who fought and died there during the 1759 Battle of Quebec. Overlooking the wide St.

De Retour caters to collectors of 1950's and 60's modern furnishings, lighting, and objét d’art. The shop, located on Rue Saint-Paul, is one of about a dozen antique retailers on what is referred to as Antiques Row.

In the heart of St.-Roch, this warehouse-like restaurant morphs into a dynamic performance space after dark. Events range from poetry slams, film screenings, and DJ sets to concerts by folk and indie bands from around the country.

Known for its immense diversity, the Musée de la Civilisation (Museum of Civilization) combines permanent historic displays with rotating, interactive exhibitions about everything from dragons to the evolution of hats.

Benjo is an innovative children’s toy store in the lively Saint-Roch neighborhood. Located directly across from L’Église Saint-Roch and with a green Art Deco-like metal arch, Benjo beckons kids and adults alike.

Boutique aux Mémoires is a Lower Town antiques store for both the serious collector and those who are curious about Quebec’s decorative past. Since 1970, this boutique has occupied the ground floor of a Colonial-style brick building along lively Rue Saint-Paul.