Quebec

Quebec Travel Guide

Look no further for the best of what to do in Quebec so you can enjoy your stay and have some fun. Those looking for outdoor things to do in Quebec will be thrilled with the province’s expansive natural landscape and sweeping vistas, inviting visitors to enjoy fishing, hunting, cycling, boating and wildlife observation.

When thinking about what to do in Quebec, do not forget the province’s many festivals that happen year round—from the dead of winter to the height of summer. The Quebec City Summer Festival is one of the main music events in Quebec and is held annually in July. Summer also boasts the Montreal Jazz Festival, the F1 Canadian Grand Prix and the Montreal Beer Festival. In winter, young revelers can enjoy Igloofest or the more family friendly Fete des Neiges, which has ziplines, tubing, sled dog tours, skating, shows, and live music.

Old Quebec City (Vieux Quebec) is the perfect place to enjoy some shopping and nightlife along the cobblestone streets filled with boutiques, cafes, patisseries and specialty shops. The historic district of Old Quebec is a great example of a fortified village. With a military and religious history, in Old Quebec the past is highlighted by the preserved architecture. Visitors can meander past horse-drawn carriages, street performers and the Rue du Trésor, an open-air art gallery. Wander along Dufferin Terrace to gaze across the beautiful St. Lawrence River—in winter you can watch the ice flow downstream.

Amongst all the things to do in Quebec, art lovers will not be disappointed. The Musée National des Beaux-Arts du Québec showcases work made in Quebec or by Quebec artists. The beautiful Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, famous for its geometric glass front, houses one of the most impressive art collections in Canada.

De Retour caters to collectors of 1950's and 60's modern furnishings, lighting, and objét d’art. The shop, located on Rue Saint-Paul, is one of about a dozen antique retailers on what is referred to as Antiques Row.

The Vietnam-born Andy Thê-Anh may be Quebec’s best women’s fashion designer—he’s certainly the city’s most polished.

The shop specializes in underground comics and illustrated novels, including titles written and produced by the store’s own publishing house.

After exploring Old Montreal, save time for a walk through Frederick Law Olmsted’s wooded and sprawling, 470-odd-acre Mont-Royal Park, which spans the northern edge of downtown and forms the western border of the Plateau Mont-Royal neighborhood.

Set in the often-narrow streets of Old Montreal, said to be some of Canada’s most haunted, these English- and French-language walking tours highlight spirits from the city’s past. Taking place in the east and west sides of the city, tours run during the summer and around Halloween.

Though Montreal after dark used to mean La Calèche du Sexe and other such red-light joints downtown, the city’s nightlife is now centered around bars instead of poles.

What Lies Beneath: At first glance Montreal does not appear to be overcrowded, but maybe that’s because everyone is underground.

Eclectic Mile End space that's one part antiques shop and one part gallery.

Between Jacques-Cartier and Clock Tower quays in the Old Port, the Patinoire du Bassin Bonsecours is a scenic outdoor skating rink along the St. Lawrence River. Each evening, from December to mid-March, a DJ plays music in styles ranging from classical to 1980’s hits.

Olympic Pedigree: Home to rowing events in the 1976 Games, and one of the largest artificial outdoor rowing facilities in North America.

 

Known for its immense diversity, the Musée de la Civilisation (Museum of Civilization) combines permanent historic displays with rotating, interactive exhibitions about everything from dragons to the evolution of hats.

This ethnic enclave filled with Hasidic, Portuguese, Italian, and Greek communities has been immortalized in the novels of Mordecai Richler, who grew up here and returned often in his books.

Quebec’s answer to American Apparel—a source for eco-friendly basics like perfectly fitting tees and baby-soft hoodies, all made in the province.

Designed by New York architect James O’Donnell, the Gothic Revival-style Notre-Dame Basilica faces Place d'Armes in Old Montreal. Although completed in 1829, the church later added its two towers a decade later—the western tower holds one giant bell and the eastern a 10-bell carillon.