Quebec

Quebec Travel Guide

Look no further for the best of what to do in Quebec so you can enjoy your stay and have some fun. Those looking for outdoor things to do in Quebec will be thrilled with the province’s expansive natural landscape and sweeping vistas, inviting visitors to enjoy fishing, hunting, cycling, boating and wildlife observation.

When thinking about what to do in Quebec, do not forget the province’s many festivals that happen year round—from the dead of winter to the height of summer. The Quebec City Summer Festival is one of the main music events in Quebec and is held annually in July. Summer also boasts the Montreal Jazz Festival, the F1 Canadian Grand Prix and the Montreal Beer Festival. In winter, young revelers can enjoy Igloofest or the more family friendly Fete des Neiges, which has ziplines, tubing, sled dog tours, skating, shows, and live music.

Old Quebec City (Vieux Quebec) is the perfect place to enjoy some shopping and nightlife along the cobblestone streets filled with boutiques, cafes, patisseries and specialty shops. The historic district of Old Quebec is a great example of a fortified village. With a military and religious history, in Old Quebec the past is highlighted by the preserved architecture. Visitors can meander past horse-drawn carriages, street performers and the Rue du Trésor, an open-air art gallery. Wander along Dufferin Terrace to gaze across the beautiful St. Lawrence River—in winter you can watch the ice flow downstream.

Amongst all the things to do in Quebec, art lovers will not be disappointed. The Musée National des Beaux-Arts du Québec showcases work made in Quebec or by Quebec artists. The beautiful Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, famous for its geometric glass front, houses one of the most impressive art collections in Canada.

Tour Lake Massawippi with guide Capitan Ross on his 1957 mahogany boat.

The historic heart of the city, Old Montreal is a portside hamlet of narrow cobblestoned streets and handsome stone buildings dating from the 18th and 19th centuries, along with a handful from the 17th.

From the same owners as Whiskey Café, Dominion Square Tavern serves a French-Canadian menu and house-made items by chef Érik Dupuis. The original chandelier and terrazzo floors have seen the space used as everything from a 1927 hotel restaurant to one of the city’s first gay bars.

At the city’s north end, Outremont is home to the city’s tony Francophones, and its main drag, Avenue Laurier Ouest, is one of Montreal’s main shopping and dining destinations.

The oldest grocer on the continent stocks English teas, French soaps, and picnic fixings (our favorites: wild boar sausage and a wedge of locally made Cumulus cheese).

Musée National des Beaux-Arts du Quebec houses Canada’s largest national art collection. Set inside three Battlefield Park (also known as "The Plains of Abraham") buildings, the museum includes almost a dozen permanent collections and world-class traveling exhibits.

Terrasse Dufferin, which is perched just below the iconic Fairmont Château le Frontenac, is a public park with sweeping vistas of the St. Lawrence River.

Proof that Montreal is an epicurean’s dream: this exquisitely ordered kitchenware store in Outremont’s poshest shopping neighborhood.

Les Tam Tams is a free music festival held on rainless Sundays from May through September; it attracts drummers, dancers, vendors, and curious visitors.

In the western suburb of Point St. Charles, this 1668 farmstead—with a handsome stone house, outbuildings, and surrounding gardens—has been transformed into a living history museum. It was originally presided over by Marguerite Bourgeoys, founder of the Congregation of Notre Dame.

Quebec’s largest national park is perfect for swimming and the new rock climbing–like “via ferrata” (ropes, ladder rungs, footholds).

Every year, during the first week of July, Montreal puts on this music celebration. Some acts have included Emmylou Harris, Paul Simon, and Mali's Amadou et Mariam, many of which play for free on outdoor states downtown.

The supermarket is the winner of the People's Choice Award for design.

Yvonne and Douglas Mandel, pioneers of the new Vieux, showcase their sharply tailored menswear here.