Quebec

Things to do in Quebec

Look no further for the best of what to do in Quebec so you can enjoy your stay and have some fun. Those looking for outdoor things to do in Quebec will be thrilled with the province’s expansive natural landscape and sweeping vistas, inviting visitors to enjoy fishing, hunting, cycling, boating and wildlife observation.

When thinking about what to do in Quebec, do not forget the province’s many festivals that happen year round—from the dead of winter to the height of summer. The Quebec City Summer Festival is one of the main music events in Quebec and is held annually in July. Summer also boasts the Montreal Jazz Festival, the F1 Canadian Grand Prix and the Montreal Beer Festival. In winter, young revelers can enjoy Igloofest or the more family friendly Fete des Neiges, which has ziplines, tubing, sled dog tours, skating, shows, and live music.

Old Quebec City (Vieux Quebec) is the perfect place to enjoy some shopping and nightlife along the cobblestone streets filled with boutiques, cafes, patisseries and specialty shops. The historic district of Old Quebec is a great example of a fortified village. With a military and religious history, in Old Quebec the past is highlighted by the preserved architecture. Visitors can meander past horse-drawn carriages, street performers and the Rue du Trésor, an open-air art gallery. Wander along Dufferin Terrace to gaze across the beautiful St. Lawrence River—in winter you can watch the ice flow downstream.

Amongst all the things to do in Quebec, art lovers will not be disappointed. The Musée National des Beaux-Arts du Québec showcases work made in Quebec or by Quebec artists. The beautiful Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, famous for its geometric glass front, houses one of the most impressive art collections in Canada.

Known for its immense diversity, the Musée de la Civilisation (Museum of Civilization) combines permanent historic displays with rotating, interactive exhibitions about everything from dragons to the evolution of hats.

This ethnic enclave filled with Hasidic, Portuguese, Italian, and Greek communities has been immortalized in the novels of Mordecai Richler, who grew up here and returned often in his books.

Quebec’s answer to American Apparel—a source for eco-friendly basics like perfectly fitting tees and baby-soft hoodies, all made in the province.

Entering the stylish Whisky Lounge is a little like stepping (one imagines) into a Havana lounge, circa 1952. It’s not just the real Cuban cigars—you’re in Canada, after all—being sold and smoked in the clubby back-room salon.

This eclectic little boutique/art gallery showcases paintings by owner Lysanne Pepin, quirky jewelry, and a handful of well-priced bohemian women’s clothing lines, including its own Espace Couture label.

To say that François Beauregard is a master of the simple, cotton-knit shirt is not to denigrate his design skills in any way. Inside his Saint-Laurent boutique, the shirts run from straightforward tanks to dressed-up tees that work equally well with suits or jeans.

Designed by Marius Dufresne and completed in 1914, the five-story Maisonneuve Market is located in its namesake district. Although historically a daily market, from the 1960s to 1995 there was a police office and cultural center in the Beaux-Arts building.

La Barberie is not a place for a haircut, but a longtime microbrewery at the crossroads of the Saint-Roch district and the entrance to Lower Town.

p>Italian Canadians, Montreal’s largest ethnic group, originally settled in this far-north neighborhood after WWII. Italian is still spoken here, and you’ll find the Marché Jean-Talon, one of the best public food markets in the city.

In the heart of St.-Roch, this warehouse-like restaurant morphs into a dynamic performance space after dark. Events range from poetry slams, film screenings, and DJ sets to concerts by folk and indie bands from around the country.

Evidence that Montreal designers can compete on the world’s stage: the glorious interior of Pullman, which merges mid-century modernism (polished wooden tables, stone floors, and a palette of gray, black, and cream) with a hint of 21st-century baroque (a multitiered wine-glass and champagne-flute

The shop features a well-curated assortment of clothing and artifacts

Dubuc made his name with his super-sleek men’s wear collections (in a palette that rarely strays far from black, gray, slate, or beige).

The oldest public market in Montreal, the Lachine Market dates to the 1840’s. The farmers’ market became a permanent market in 1909, and the bulk of items on sale are still basics like local cheeses, fresh breads, and garden vegetables.