Quebec

Quebec Travel Guide

Just to the east of downtown, Montreal’s gay village has terraced restaurants and clubs along Rue Saint-Denis (which runs through the Latin Quarter), and buzzing gay bars to the east on Rue Sainte-Catherine.

Adventure seekers should arrange an afternoon of windsurfing through this experienced local outfitter.

The 119-year-old grocery has plenty of Québécois cheeses.

Boutique aux Mémoires is a Lower Town antiques store for both the serious collector and those who are curious about Quebec’s decorative past. Since 1970, this boutique has occupied the ground floor of a Colonial-style brick building along lively Rue Saint-Paul.

This traditionally working-class western suburb has several surviving historic sights, including the lovely Maison Saint-Gabriel.

Fans of vintage clothing shouldn’t miss this 15-year-old shop for its well-curated selection of designer hats, scarves, and party dresses from the 40’s to the 70’s.

To say that François Beauregard is a master of the simple, cotton-knit shirt is not to denigrate his design skills in any way. Inside his Saint-Laurent boutique, the shirts run from straightforward tanks to dressed-up tees that work equally well with suits or jeans.

Designed by Marius Dufresne and completed in 1914, the five-story Maisonneuve Market is located in its namesake district. Although historically a daily market, from the 1960s to 1995 there was a police office and cultural center in the Beaux-Arts building.

The kooky sister establishment to bar Plan B, Bily Kun hangs mounted ostrich heads along its 20-foot-high walls by way of decoration.

Original Debut: Home to a fading vaudeville scene when it opened in 1913, the Imperial became a movie house in 1934 when it was leased to Léo-Ernest Ouimet (owner of the Ouimetoscope, the first movie theater in Canada).

Close to the bike paths along the Lachine Canal, Le Marche Atwater pieces together a farmers’ market atmosphere from a mix of pastry shops, chocolatiers, and flower stalls.

The Plains of Abraham is one of Canada’s most scenic monuments, as well as hallowed ground for French and British soldiers who fought and died there during the 1759 Battle of Quebec. Overlooking the wide St.

In the heart of St.-Roch, this warehouse-like restaurant morphs into a dynamic performance space after dark. Events range from poetry slams, film screenings, and DJ sets to concerts by folk and indie bands from around the country.

La Barberie is not a place for a haircut, but a longtime microbrewery at the crossroads of the Saint-Roch district and the entrance to Lower Town.