Quebec

Quebec Travel Guide

Montreal has great bike trails throughout the city and along the water. The best of them is the one that follows the Lachine Canal for about nine miles, from the old city to the western suburbs.

Explore and sample imported French goods and fresh Canadian products at these four public markets;

Entering the stylish Whisky Lounge is a little like stepping (one imagines) into a Havana lounge, circa 1952. It’s not just the real Cuban cigars—you’re in Canada, after all—being sold and smoked in the clubby back-room salon.

This eclectic little boutique/art gallery showcases paintings by owner Lysanne Pepin, quirky jewelry, and a handful of well-priced bohemian women’s clothing lines, including its own Espace Couture label.

Adventure seekers should arrange an afternoon of windsurfing through this experienced local outfitter.

The 119-year-old grocery has plenty of Québécois cheeses.

Just to the east of downtown, Montreal’s gay village has terraced restaurants and clubs along Rue Saint-Denis (which runs through the Latin Quarter), and buzzing gay bars to the east on Rue Sainte-Catherine.

Boutique aux Mémoires is a Lower Town antiques store for both the serious collector and those who are curious about Quebec’s decorative past. Since 1970, this boutique has occupied the ground floor of a Colonial-style brick building along lively Rue Saint-Paul.

This traditionally working-class western suburb has several surviving historic sights, including the lovely Maison Saint-Gabriel.

Fans of vintage clothing shouldn’t miss this 15-year-old shop for its well-curated selection of designer hats, scarves, and party dresses from the 40’s to the 70’s.

To say that François Beauregard is a master of the simple, cotton-knit shirt is not to denigrate his design skills in any way. Inside his Saint-Laurent boutique, the shirts run from straightforward tanks to dressed-up tees that work equally well with suits or jeans.

Designed by Marius Dufresne and completed in 1914, the five-story Maisonneuve Market is located in its namesake district. Although historically a daily market, from the 1960s to 1995 there was a police office and cultural center in the Beaux-Arts building.

The kooky sister establishment to bar Plan B, Bily Kun hangs mounted ostrich heads along its 20-foot-high walls by way of decoration.

Original Debut: Home to a fading vaudeville scene when it opened in 1913, the Imperial became a movie house in 1934 when it was leased to Léo-Ernest Ouimet (owner of the Ouimetoscope, the first movie theater in Canada).