Quebec

Restaurants in Quebec

Quebec restaurants are known for having delicious French cuisine that you can enjoy at a leisurely pace. Fast food is very uncommon, so be ready for relaxing meals full of lively conversation. In the restaurants in Quebec you can find traditional French dishes, such as foie gras or moules marinières, as well as the more unusual French-Canadian dishes such as the tourtière, a meat pie, or poutine, gravy and cheese curd over fries. And because Quebec draws people from all over the world there are plenty of international restaurants to choose from.

Among the restaurants in Quebec, some of the most highly rated are in Montreal, like Maison Boulud in the Ritz-Carlton and Les 400 Coups, two of the finest dining experiences in Canada. For more casual, home cooking, try Schwartz's Deli, a local favorite with thick corned beef sandwiches perfect for a picnic in the park. Dig into some poutine at any number of roadside diners for a delicious snack. Try the tiny shack Patate Mallette, which locals all agree is one of the best, and munch your fries while you watch boats go by on the St. Lawrence River. Travel + Leisure guides you to the best restaurants in Quebec so you can taste it all during your stay in French Canada.

One part restaurant, one part late-night bar, Garde Manger offers innovative seafood and a seat at the hottest party in town.

Hand-rolled gnocchi made with no potato, only ricotta, and Grana Padano cheeses, and osso buco with red wine risotto are chef Graziella Batista's signature northern Italian dishes at her namesake restaurant.

Dépanneur le Pick Up is one of Montreal’s many convenience stores, turned quirky lunch counter and diet-sensitive bakery. Seating is available near the indoor counter or on the back patio. Along with beer and candy bars, Le Pick Up sells breakfasts made on St.

This French-style deli-cum-bistro in Old Montreal is cluttered with chalkboards, Paris street signs, vintage canned goods, and faux meat hanging from the ceiling.

Set along a quiet side street between the bustling Old Port and Rue St.-Jean districts, Chez Temporel has been a haven for affordable breakfasts, lunches, and café au lait bowls since the mid-70's.

If you think you love the New York bagel, your loyalty might be tested by Montreal’s small, dense, and sweet version of the boiled classic. The best place to sample them lies beyond the perpetually steamed windows of this tiny storefront, whose owners have been turning out bagels since 1919.

Politicos, journalists, academics, and Francophone matrons all gather at this polished and light-filled dining room in the fashionable Outremont neighborhood.

Bouchonné closed in 2010.

Opened in 1995, this sushi bar specializes in using imported fish from Japanese and other world markets. So fresh it's sometimes delivered still alive, the fish selections are the main attraction of chef Antonio Park’s omakase, or sushi tasting menu.

Traditional French cuisine is the specialty at Chez Gautier, which has been a Montreal staple since the 1970's. The bistro is styled after a Parisian brasserie, with leather benches, dark woodwork, and brass pillars.

This lively restaurant, manned by chef Martin Picard, has earned a cultlike following both within the city and abroad for its obsessive (and inventive) preparations of all things meat.

For eight years, chef Laurent Godbout has been putting a delicious spin on classics (try his pan-seared sea bass with squid-ink risotto, scallops, and a chorizo cream sauce) in this Old Montreal dining room—and he hasn’t missed a beat yet.

Madona, one of the city's original cheap-pizza joints, serves its 99-cent slices until the early-morning hours. Located on a busy stretch of Saint-Laurent where the “The Main” intersects pedestrian Prince Arthur Street, the pizzeria is close to bars and nightclubs.