Quebec

Restaurants in Quebec

Quebec restaurants are known for having delicious French cuisine that you can enjoy at a leisurely pace. Fast food is very uncommon, so be ready for relaxing meals full of lively conversation. In the restaurants in Quebec you can find traditional French dishes, such as foie gras or moules marinières, as well as the more unusual French-Canadian dishes such as the tourtière, a meat pie, or poutine, gravy and cheese curd over fries. And because Quebec draws people from all over the world there are plenty of international restaurants to choose from.

Among the restaurants in Quebec, some of the most highly rated are in Montreal, like Maison Boulud in the Ritz-Carlton and Les 400 Coups, two of the finest dining experiences in Canada. For more casual, home cooking, try Schwartz's Deli, a local favorite with thick corned beef sandwiches perfect for a picnic in the park. Dig into some poutine at any number of roadside diners for a delicious snack. Try the tiny shack Patate Mallette, which locals all agree is one of the best, and munch your fries while you watch boats go by on the St. Lawrence River. Travel + Leisure guides you to the best restaurants in Quebec so you can taste it all during your stay in French Canada.

Laloux is a Parisian-style bistro in the Plateau neighborhood that offers all of its wines by the glass. The chefs use certified-sustainable seafood and seasonal produce to create menus that change daily.

For eight years, chef Laurent Godbout has been putting a delicious spin on classics (try his pan-seared sea bass with squid-ink risotto, scallops, and a chorizo cream sauce) in this Old Montreal dining room—and he hasn’t missed a beat yet.

Madona, one of the city's original cheap-pizza joints, serves its 99-cent slices until the early-morning hours. Located on a busy stretch of Saint-Laurent where the “The Main” intersects pedestrian Prince Arthur Street, the pizzeria is close to bars and nightclubs.

Eric Borderon is a French-born and trained artisan baker (boulanger) and pastry chef (pâtissier).

Opened in 1998 as a bakery but then expanded into a café, Olive & Gourmando has a menu of sandwiches served on homemade bread, pastries encasing Valrhona chocolate, and housemade ricotta.

Although the Sparrow has changed chefs since its 2009 opening, the Mile End restaurant still offers all-you-can-eat brunch. The family-style spread includes French toast, cheese and zucchini frittata, balsamic chutney, and fruit brioche.

Dine on pouding chômeur (caramel pudding) and enjoy views of the St.

You will recognize Abu Elias, a large Lebanese takeaway grill and grocery, not by the name painted on the window but by its always-crowded corner parking lot.

Set among Vieux-Montréal’s cobblestoned lanes, this eatery is marked only by the antler-and-fish crest hanging outside the door (appropriate, since chasse et pêche means “hunting and fishing”).

DNA

To create his Canadian cuisine, chef Derek Dammann draws ingredients from all parts of the animal as well as what's in-season at the market.

Peruvian-born chef and owner of Laurier-West restaurant Raza, Mario Navarrete Jr. opened Madre, his second restaurant, in 2007.

Happy hour starts at noon at this 12-seat luncheonette.

It may be a little contrarian to recommend the Main, a 35-year-old smoked-meat lunch counter on Saint-Laurent, over the more legendary Schwartz’s just across the street. But that’s the point.

Open since 1980, the restaurant is still the spot for expertly prepared French classics such as the generous pot-au-feu or the citrusy octopus-and-lentil salad.