Quebec

Restaurants in Quebec

Quebec restaurants are known for having delicious French cuisine that you can enjoy at a leisurely pace. Fast food is very uncommon, so be ready for relaxing meals full of lively conversation. In the restaurants in Quebec you can find traditional French dishes, such as foie gras or moules marinières, as well as the more unusual French-Canadian dishes such as the tourtière, a meat pie, or poutine, gravy and cheese curd over fries. And because Quebec draws people from all over the world there are plenty of international restaurants to choose from.

Among the restaurants in Quebec, some of the most highly rated are in Montreal, like Maison Boulud in the Ritz-Carlton and Les 400 Coups, two of the finest dining experiences in Canada. For more casual, home cooking, try Schwartz's Deli, a local favorite with thick corned beef sandwiches perfect for a picnic in the park. Dig into some poutine at any number of roadside diners for a delicious snack. Try the tiny shack Patate Mallette, which locals all agree is one of the best, and munch your fries while you watch boats go by on the St. Lawrence River. Travel + Leisure guides you to the best restaurants in Quebec so you can taste it all during your stay in French Canada.

Set among Vieux-Montréal’s cobblestoned lanes, this eatery is marked only by the antler-and-fish crest hanging outside the door (appropriate, since chasse et pêche means “hunting and fishing”).

DNA

To create his Canadian cuisine, chef Derek Dammann draws ingredients from all parts of the animal as well as what's in-season at the market.

Chef Michel Ross creates a dynamic menu in this neighborhood hideaway.

Open since 1980, the restaurant is still the spot for expertly prepared French classics such as the generous pot-au-feu or the citrusy octopus-and-lentil salad.

Located in the city's Mile End district, Jun-I serves fresh fish and inventive Japanese-style dishes from namesake chef Junichi Ikematsu.

Located in the Mile End area, Wilensky’s Light Lunch serves unfussy sandwiches and fountain sodas. Opened in 1932, the restaurant was made an icon by Mordecai Richler’s The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz (1959).

Opened in 1928, this kosher-style Jewish deli marinates its meat for 10 full days before hot-smoking it. The preservative-free beef brisket (similar to pastrami) is ordered by the fat content: either fat, medium-fat, medium, or lean.

The place to go, for a rosy filet mignon with a blue-cheese sauce.

Stop for a latte and ham and cheese omelette at this café in a converted train station on the rail path.

A secret marinade and wood-charcoal grilling make the Portuguese barbecued chicken Rotisserie Portugalia's signature dish. The chicken has a loyal following and must be ordered an hour in advance.

Boudoir Lounge is the St.-Roch district’s see-and-be-seen joint for New French cuisine, cocktails, and a late-night music scene. Marked by a black awning and terrace, the lounge is located on a pedestrian-only cobbled street.

Chef-owners Frédéric Morin and David McMillan are the mavericks behind Joe Beef, a delightfully disheveled counterpoint to the city’s often overstyled restaurants.

Located in the Notre-Dame-de-Grâce neighborhood, Cosmos was opened in 1967 by Crete-born Tony Koulakis. The eatery has just 11 stools, where customers sit to enjoy the greasy-spoon-style meals.