Quebec

Restaurants in Quebec

Quebec restaurants are known for having delicious French cuisine that you can enjoy at a leisurely pace. Fast food is very uncommon, so be ready for relaxing meals full of lively conversation. In the restaurants in Quebec you can find traditional French dishes, such as foie gras or moules marinières, as well as the more unusual French-Canadian dishes such as the tourtière, a meat pie, or poutine, gravy and cheese curd over fries. And because Quebec draws people from all over the world there are plenty of international restaurants to choose from.

Among the restaurants in Quebec, some of the most highly rated are in Montreal, like Maison Boulud in the Ritz-Carlton and Les 400 Coups, two of the finest dining experiences in Canada. For more casual, home cooking, try Schwartz's Deli, a local favorite with thick corned beef sandwiches perfect for a picnic in the park. Dig into some poutine at any number of roadside diners for a delicious snack. Try the tiny shack Patate Mallette, which locals all agree is one of the best, and munch your fries while you watch boats go by on the St. Lawrence River. Travel + Leisure guides you to the best restaurants in Quebec so you can taste it all during your stay in French Canada.

In 2004, when chef Normand Laprise moved his acclaimed restaurant from its neighborhood haunt up in the Plateau to this airy space downtown, he might have been sending a message with his choice of décor: red carpet all the way.

Greek seafood restaurant Milos opened in Montreal in 1979 and was chef-owner Costas Spiliadis’ first eatery, preceding locations in New York, Athens, and Las Vegas. Fresh seafood ranges from sardines and octopus to Gulf shrimp and red snapper—all served with olive oil pressed by Spiliadis’ sister

Laloux is a Parisian-style bistro in the Plateau neighborhood that offers all of its wines by the glass. The chefs use certified-sustainable seafood and seasonal produce to create menus that change daily.

This neighborhood bistro hits all the marks of Nouvelle Montréal cuisine: taxidermy in the dining room, chalkboard of nose-to-tail specials, and scruffy hipster chefs in baseball caps.

Dine on pouding chômeur (caramel pudding) and enjoy views of the St.

You will recognize Abu Elias, a large Lebanese takeaway grill and grocery, not by the name painted on the window but by its always-crowded corner parking lot.

It may be a little contrarian to recommend the Main, a 35-year-old smoked-meat lunch counter on Saint-Laurent, over the more legendary Schwartz’s just across the street. But that’s the point.

Just steps from the Jean-Talon farmers’ market, diners sit at a counter and watch chef-owners Mathieu Cloutier and Jean-Philippe St.-Denis cook up whatever’s freshest. (With only one other employee, the chefs are also the restaurant’s servers, sommeliers, and dishwashers.)

Bistro Bienville opened in 2006 on a tucked-away, tree-lined residential street that’s a five-minute walk from St. Denis. The restaurant's dining room has white walls and narrow tables, and the exposed kitchen produces an ever-changing menu of a dozen or so dishes.

Located beside the Old Port cruise terminal, this waterfront eatery serves Parisian-style bistro fare amid panoramic views of the St. Lawrence River.

Set in Montreal’s Little Italy, home to a large Italian population since the 19th-century, Caffe San Simeon has been making espresso, lattes, and cappuccinos since 1996. An Italian flag hangs in the window of the café, which serves drinks in colorful espresso cups and tall glass tumblers.

Set on one of the sweetest little streets in the city, next to a row of London-style terrace houses and across from an old-school convenience store, the pint-size Montée has been wooing in-the-know locals with its forward-thinking (and remarkably affordable) degustation menus for a handful of yea