Quebec

Restaurants in Quebec

Quebec restaurants are known for having delicious French cuisine that you can enjoy at a leisurely pace. Fast food is very uncommon, so be ready for relaxing meals full of lively conversation. In the restaurants in Quebec you can find traditional French dishes, such as foie gras or moules marinières, as well as the more unusual French-Canadian dishes such as the tourtière, a meat pie, or poutine, gravy and cheese curd over fries. And because Quebec draws people from all over the world there are plenty of international restaurants to choose from.

Among the restaurants in Quebec, some of the most highly rated are in Montreal, like Maison Boulud in the Ritz-Carlton and Les 400 Coups, two of the finest dining experiences in Canada. For more casual, home cooking, try Schwartz's Deli, a local favorite with thick corned beef sandwiches perfect for a picnic in the park. Dig into some poutine at any number of roadside diners for a delicious snack. Try the tiny shack Patate Mallette, which locals all agree is one of the best, and munch your fries while you watch boats go by on the St. Lawrence River. Travel + Leisure guides you to the best restaurants in Quebec so you can taste it all during your stay in French Canada.

If you think you love the New York bagel, your loyalty might be tested by Montreal’s small, dense, and sweet version of the boiled classic. The best place to sample them lies beyond the perpetually steamed windows of this tiny storefront, whose owners have been turning out bagels since 1919.

Lunch on pressed charcuterie sandwiches at Cluny ArtBar, a funky little art gallery and café housed in a former foundry.

Rotisserie Romados is known for its wood-charcoal-grilled Portuguese chicken served under a mountain of French fries. At the small corner restaurant, which opened in 1994, cooks use a paintbrush to drizzle the chicken, rice, and seasoned fries with spiced chili oil.

Situated on an ancient cobblestoned street in the Old Port district, this casual French bistro is often packed with locals throughout the day. Inside, the restaurant is decorated with parquet floors, built-in wooden cabinets, large mirrors, and tentacle-like chandeliers with exposed bulbs.

Le Café St.-Malo, a French bistro with a simple blue-and-white painted exterior, inhabits the ground floor of a gray brick building built in 1850.

In a town brimming with boulangeries, Paillard stands head and shoulders above the rest: manned by a Parisian master baker, it turns out whisper-light patisserie, sandwiches on crusty baguettes, and irresistible vanilla-pear jam.

Politicos, journalists, academics, and Francophone matrons all gather at this polished and light-filled dining room in the fashionable Outremont neighborhood.

Bouchonné closed in 2010.

Réservoir's large arched windows open in summer and its second-floor terrace overlooks raised-bed gardens and iron lampposts along cobbled Duluth Avenue. Bare wooden tables and beer vats fill the brasserie-style brewpub.

In 2004, when chef Normand Laprise moved his acclaimed restaurant from its neighborhood haunt up in the Plateau to this airy space downtown, he might have been sending a message with his choice of décor: red carpet all the way.

Greek seafood restaurant Milos opened in Montreal in 1979 and was chef-owner Costas Spiliadis’ first eatery, preceding locations in New York, Athens, and Las Vegas. Fresh seafood ranges from sardines and octopus to Gulf shrimp and red snapper—all served with olive oil pressed by Spiliadis’ sister

Opened in 1995, this sushi bar specializes in using imported fish from Japanese and other world markets. So fresh it's sometimes delivered still alive, the fish selections are the main attraction of chef Antonio Park’s omakase, or sushi tasting menu.